Red Deer College to host Dragons’ Den-style competition, seminar for aspiring entrepreneurs

Red Deer College will host two events to educate and encourage small business owners in Central Alberta.

The Business Basics for the Aspiring Entrepreneur seminar and Breakthrough Your Business, a Dragons’ Den-style competition, will be held early next year.

Darcy Mykytyshyn, dean of RDC’s Donald School of Business, said the events will provide unique opportunities and introduce people to foundational business knowledge and skills.

“Central Alberta is filled with people who have innovative ideas and entrepreneurial spirits,” said Mykytyshyn.

The free one-day Business Basics for the Aspiring Entrepreneur seminar provides information for people interested in starting and operating a small business. Topics include legal structure and risk management, financing, accounting, key steps and more.

Breakthrough Your Business, which takes place March 9, will see people create a business plan and proposal, and present them to a panel of judges.

The first and second place winners will receive $6,000 and $4,000, respectively, to help them start their business. Each winner will also receive a $500 tuition voucher for RDC’s School of Continuing Education.

Competitors will be able to partner with students to develop the business proposal.

“This is a great example of collaboration and learning, with students from the Donald School of Business working with local people to help them develop viable business plans.

“It’s a practical learning opportunity that has benefits for everyone involved,” said Mykytyshyn.

The expression of interest registration deadline for the competition is Jan. 18, and the submission deadline is Feb. 15. The final five contestants will be notified Feb. 22.

For more information, contact BreakthroughYourBusiness@rdc.ab.ca.

The Business Basics for the Aspiring Entrepreneur seminar, which is required for Breakthrough Your Business, is Jan. 26.



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