Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer says council has a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion, and is committed to working in a shared relationship with the Indigenous community. (File photo by Advocate staff)

Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer says council has a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion, and is committed to working in a shared relationship with the Indigenous community. (File photo by Advocate staff)

City of Red Deer committed to reconciliation: mayor

Canada’s first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Mayor Tara Veer encouraged all Red Deerians to reflect, recognize and participate in remembering the legacy of residential schools in the spirit of Truth and Reconciliation on Thursday.

“The City of Red Deer acknowledges the Indigenous traditional territories represented by Treaty 6 and Treaty 7 as the land the city is situated on. This land is also acknowledged by the city as an historic Métis gathering site. The goal of the City of Red Deer is to work together with Indigenous and Métis peoples in building welcoming and inclusive community life,” said Veer on behalf of city council and local citizens.

“The City of Red Deer is committed to reconciliation and ensuring the tragic history and ongoing legacy of residential schools is never forgotten. For more than 100 years, Indigenous children in Canada were removed from their families and sent to residential schools. While this happened across the country, right here in central Alberta, the Red Deer Industrial School operated from 1889 to 1919, and has had lasting effects on survivors, families and our community.”

Related:

Canada marks first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

She said council has a strong commitment to diversity and inclusion, and is committed to working in a shared relationship with the Indigenous community in Red Deer.

In August, the federal government passed legislation to make Sept. 30 a federal statutory holiday called the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, which aligns with Orange Shirt Day, to recognize and remember the residential schools and the ongoing impacts to survivors, family members and our community.

“Observing the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is another step in our journey towards diversity and inclusion in our organization and our community. Reconciliation is about Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples coming to terms with the events of the past in a manner that rebuilds trust and respectful relationships. This will enable us to build healthy relationships with a focus on bettering future generations in our community, and our country,” Veer said.

Related:

Businesses, schools and cities observing National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

“Today, and every day, we must honour the heritage, contributions and cultures of First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities. We stand with you in remembering the past, and look forward to affirming our relationship and partnership in actioning our local commitment to Truth and Reconciliation.”



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