Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Thursday that those who have been infected recently with the COVID-19 Omicron variant can still get a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine once they are asymptomatic. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw said Thursday that those who have been infected recently with the COVID-19 Omicron variant can still get a third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine once they are asymptomatic. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)

Red Deer up to 1,242 active cases of COVID-19

Alberta now has 64,129 active cases of COVID-19.

The new active case total comes as the province reported 6,163 new infections Friday, based on 16,541 tests for a positivity rate of 37 per cent.

There are now 822 people in hospital across the province infected with COVID-19, including 81 in the ICU. There were five new deaths due to the implications of COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, bringing the death toll to 3,380.

As daily infections from COVID-19 continue to rise, Alberta chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw, had a recommendation for those who have been recently infected with the Omicron variant.

She explained on Thursday that if those individuals haven’t yet had a booster, they would still be okay to do so after they quarantine for five days and are no longer symptomatic depending on their situation.

“The national advisory committee and our own Alberta advisory committee have debated this question on numerous occasions and they have landed on the recommendation that someone can consider going for a booster once they are feeling better from their infection,” she said.

“There’s pros and cons in waiting for the booster… because ultimately an individual may have certain medical conditions or factors of what they do for their occupation that might put them at risk of future exposure. So that timeline of when they’ve been infected, when they’ve recovered and when they get a booster… each interval has its pros and cons.”

About 89.7 per cent of Albertans aged 12 and older have received one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, while 85.7 per cent aged 12 and older have received two doses, and 158,000 children aged five to 11 have received their first dose of pediatric vaccine.

Friday the province announced they had surpassed eight million doses of the COVID-19 vaccine administered, with more than 1.2 million people getting a third dose since Dec. 7.

“I am proud that (Alberta Health Services) and pharmacies have responded to the increased demand for vaccine by quickly and safely delivering doses to the Albertans who need them,” said Jason Copping, Minister of Health in a press release Friday.

“Vaccines are an important part of our efforts to prevent hospitals and ICUs from being overwhelmed with new cases of COVID-19, so it is critical that every Albertan continues to get each dose they are eligible for.”

According to geospatial mapping on the provincial government’s website, Red Deer sits at 1,242 active cases of COVID-19, with 11,157 total cases. The city has 9,831 recovered cases and 84 deaths due to the implications of COVID-19.

Meanwhile, in the Central zone, there were 3,817 active COVID cases on Friday, with 85 people in hospital and eight in intensive care.

The City of Wetaskiwin had 255 active cases, Red Deer County had 258, the City of Lacombe had 140, Mountain View County had 126, Sylvan Lake had 111, Lacombe County had 110, Clearwater County had 94, Olds had 107 and Stettler County had 67 active cases.

The City of Camrose had 188, Kneehill County had 45, Camrose County has 18 and Drumheller had 90.

Wetaskiwin County, including Maskwacis, had 555 active cases, while Ponoka, including East Ponoka County, had 147 and Rimbey, including West Ponoka County and part of Lacombe County, had 37.



byron.hackett@reddeeradvocate.com

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