Syrian rebel group names new leaders after explosion killed nearly a dozen leading members

A Syrian rebel group named a new leader and military chief on Wednesday, less than 24 hours after an explosion killed a dozen of its senior figures in a devastating blow to one of the most powerful factions in the country’s armed opposition.

BEIRUT — A Syrian rebel group named a new leader and military chief on Wednesday, less than 24 hours after an explosion killed a dozen of its senior figures in a devastating blow to one of the most powerful factions in the country’s armed opposition.

The group, Ahrar al-Sham, has been among the steadiest and most effective forces fighting to oust President Bashar Assad in Syria’s civil war. It has also been on the front lines of a now nine-month battle in northern Syria against the extremist Islamic State group.

The deaths of so many of its leaders throws Ahrar al-Sham’s future into question, while also laying bare the tangled dynamics of Syria’s broader anti-Assad scene just as the United States is considering injecting itself into the country’s conflict by going after the Islamic State group. Washington’s efforts to crush the extremists could include ramping up support for Syria’s rebels.

The U.S. has long looked askance at Ahrar al-Sham, considering the group too radical for Washington’s tastes and too cozy with the al-Qaida-linked Nusra Front. For that reason, the limited support Washington has provided so far to rebels was not directed Ahrar al-Sham’s way.

But the group managed to fuse its ultraconservative religious views with a more practical political position, allowing it to act as a bridge of sorts between the more moderate Western-backed rebel groups and hard-line factions. And although Washington had qualms about working with the group, Ahrar al-Sham has been a fierce enemy of the Islamic State group, and has lost thousands of men since January fighting the extremists.

Perhaps the most successful group to battle the militants is a battle-hardened Kurdish faction known by its local acronym, the YPK. However, the group is effectively the Syrian branch of a Turkish-Kurdish organization that NATO has designated as a terrorist organization.

On Wednesday, the YPG and eight other rebel groups announced a new coalition to fight the Islamic State group, calling for international aid. The formation of the new coalition also was reported by the British-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

Taking the fight against the Islamic State group to Syria also underscores the further complication of whether the U.S. will be inadvertently aiding Assad’s government. On Wednesday, Syrian Foreign Minister Walid al-Moallem called on the international community to “fight terrorism,” particularly the Islamic State group, as a first priority.

Following the death of Ahrar al-Sham’s leadership, it remains unclear whether the group could survive the loss of nearly all of its senior members, including leader Hassan Aboud. They were killed late Tuesday when an explosion struck a high-level meeting in the town of Ram Hamdan in Syria’s Idlib province.

It was not immediately clear who was behind Tuesday’s explosion, and there even were conflicting reports on the nature of the blast. The Observatory said it was a car bombing. Ahrar al-Sham’s described it as only an explosion.

On Wednesday, a spokesman for the group said in a video statement posted online that Hashem al-Sheik, better known by his nickname Abu Jaber, would assume overall leadership of the group. Another fighter, identified as Abu Saleh Tahan was appointed military commander. The spokesman also said Ahrar al-Sham would forge ahead with its fight against Assad as well as the Islamic State group.

In a video posted online Wednesday, Abu Jaber eulogized his fallen comrades and urged his fighters to remain steadfast in their mission.

Abu Jaber led a rebel brigade in the town of Maskana in northern Syria before his faction was subsumed by Ahrar al-Sham nearly two years ago, according to Aron Lund, author of a report on the group for the Swedish Institute for International Affairs. Abu Jaber later served as a commander of Ahrar al-Sham’s eastern forces.

Little more than that is known about either man, and it was not immediately clear what direction they would take the group. The decision will have an impact on the wider rebel scene because Ahrar al-Sham is a leading member of an alliance of seven conservative and ultraconservative rebel groups known as the Islamic Front.

The Islamic Front wants to create an Islamic state in Syria, rejects the Western-backed political opposition in exile but frequently collaborates with mainstream rebel groups that are supported by the U.S. and its allies. In recent months, however, some of the factions within the alliance have adopted a more moderate stance, potentially as a way to curry favour with the U.S. and secure Washington’s backing.

Ahrar al-Sham’s new leaders could steer the group in that direction, or they could plot a new course more in line with the Nusra Front and other radicals.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The union representing workers at the Olymel meat processing plant in Red Deer confirmed the death of a worker on Wednesday. (Advocate file photo)
Union confirms death of worker from Olymel plant

An investigation by the UFCW 401 local has confirmed a fourth death… Continue reading

Preliminary data shows Alberta’s suicide rate declined in 2020 — but some mental health critics say it’s too early to draw any conclusions since more dire pandemic impacts are only now being felt. (metrocreative stock)
Alberta’s suicide rate seems to have declined in 2020

But some experts say it’s too early to credit the pandemic

Sunterra Market is preparing to open at Bower Place. (Photo from Facebook)
Sunterra Market to open in Red Deer in March

Bower Place to welcome grocery shoppers

Weather brief (Photo by LANA MICHELIN/Advocate staff).
Red Deer experiences driest winter in 99 years

The city only had 9.6 millimeters of precipitation between December and February

Conservative leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Tuesday, March 2, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Conservative MP David Sweet joins chorus calling for end to COVID-19 restrictions

OTTAWA — A Conservative MP has joined the chorus of voices calling… Continue reading

The Onslow Belmont Fire Brigade is seen in Lower Onslow, N.S., Wednesday, April 22, 2020. The RCMP says two officers who fired towards a civilian and another RCMP officer during last year’s mass shooting will remain on administrative duties until internal inquiries are completed .THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
N.S. RCMP who shot at firehall on administrative duty during internal reviews of case

HALIFAX — The RCMP says two officers who fired towards a civilian… Continue reading

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rises during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021. Efforts to increase Canada's ability to produce vaccines is among over 100 projects receiving new federal money. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Over 100 new projects to get $518 million in federal research funding

OTTAWA — Efforts to boost Canada’s ability to produce vaccines are among… Continue reading

Hassan Diab, whose allegations of involvement in a 1980 synagogue bombing were dismissed by French judges for lack of evidence, listens during a press release on the release of an external review on his extradition by the Justice Department on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, Friday, July 26, 2019. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is signalling that Canada will stand up for Diab, an Ottawa sociology professor facing trial in France, following calls from human-rights advocates to intervene. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Trudeau signals support for Hassan Diab as Ottawa professor appeals case in France

OTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is signalling Canada will stand up… Continue reading

NDP MP Niki Ashton stands during question period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Thursday, April 26, 2018. Two prominent Jewish advocacy groups are voicing anti-Semitism concerns ahead of a public conversation between NDP MP Niki Ashton and former U.K. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Jewish groups raise anti-Semitism concerns ahead of NDP MP’s chat with Corbyn

OTTAWA — Two prominent Jewish advocacy groups are voicing concerns about anti-Semitism… Continue reading

Major-General Dany Fortin, left, looks on as Minister of Public Services and Procurement Anita Anand provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic, in Ottawa, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020. The Public Health Agency of Canada has set aside up to $5 billion to pay for COVID-19 vaccines. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Public Health Agency of Canada budgets $5B for COVID-19 vaccines, treatments

OTTAWA — The Public Health Agency of Canada expects to spend up… Continue reading

A vial of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a family doctor office, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 in Paris. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP -Christophe Ena
Trudeau ‘optimistic’ that timeline for rollout of COVID vaccines can be accelerated

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau expressed optimism Wednesday that his government’s timeline for… Continue reading

UCP MLA for Lacombe-Ponoka Ron Orr. (File photo)
MLA Ron Orr: Benchmarks were achieved but goalposts were moved

Orr responds to concerns, calls on province to fully open Step 2

Most Read