Teacher out of hospital after stopping school shooting

NOBLESVILLE, Ind. — An Indiana science teacher was released from a hospital a day after he was shot while tackling an armed student inside his classroom, a congresswoman said Saturday.

Republican U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks posted a video on Twitter saying she met Jason Seaman during a visit to Noblesville West Middle School.

“He is that hero teacher who stopped the shooter from hurting more young people,” Brooks said.

The only other person shot, student Ella Whistler, was in critical but stable condition, according to her family. They released a statement saying they were still trying to process “what happened and why.”

President Donald Trump sent a tweet Saturday thanking Seaman “for his heroic act in saving so many precious young lives. His quick and automatic action is being talked about all over the world!”

Vice-President Mike Pence, the former governor of Indiana, also credited the teacher’s “courageous action” for saving lives during the shooting at the suburban Indianapolis school.

“We’re all proud of you Jason and are praying for you and those impacted and recovering from injuries,” Pence said in his own tweet.

Janna Lynas of Noblesville, whose son was coached by Seaman in football, said the teacher is a hero “and everyone here feels it.”

“I believe it was probably very instinctual with him. There was potential for a lot of lives being lost,” Lynas said Saturday.

She said she wasn’t surprised to hear that Seaman intervened to save students. Lynas said Seaman emphasized character last year when he coached her son.

“He made it very clear: Yes, we are going to be playing football but if your grades aren’t good, you’re not going to be playing football,” Lynas said.

Ethan Stonebraker, a student witness, said the shooter was acting suspiciously when he walked into the classroom while the class was taking a test Friday. He told ABC News that Seaman threw a basketball at the shooter and ran toward the bullets as screaming students sought cover behind a table.

“If it weren’t for him, more of us would have been injured for sure,” the seventh grader said.

Jeremy Seaman told The Indianapolis Star that his brother was shot three times and underwent surgery. He said Jason Seaman was a defensive end for Southern Illinois University’s football team and had never been a person to run away.

Investigators said the shooter had asked to be dismissed from the class before returning with two guns. He was arrested “extremely quickly” following the shooting around 9 a.m. Friday, local police Chief Kevin Jowitt said.

Authorities didn’t release the student’s name or say whether he had been in trouble before but indicated he likely acted alone. Police said the student didn’t appear to be injured.

Stonebraker said he knew the suspected gunman. He described him as “a nice kid most of the times” and said he often joked with the classmates.

“It’s just a shock he would do something like that,” Stonebraker said.

Hours after the shooting, law enforcement agents sealed off part of an upscale neighbourhood in Noblesville but weren’t commenting on whether the suspect lived there. Sandy McWilliams, a member of a landscaping crew working nearby, said six officers toting assault rifles entered a home.

Students were bused to the Noblesville High School gym, where hundreds of parents and other family members arrived to retrieve them.

Authorities referred to a prompt and heroic response at the school but didn’t confirm accounts of Seaman tackling the student or describe the role of the resource officer who was stationed at the school.

When asked to elaborate on his praise of the response, Indiana State Police Superintendent Doug Carter said: “Wait ‘til one day we can tell you that story. You’ll be proud of them, too.”

The attack came a week after a shooting at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, that killed eight students and two teachers, and months after the high school attack that killed 17 people in Parkland, Florida. The Florida attack inspired students there and across the country to call for more restrictions on access to guns.

 

Just Posted

Cannabis facility proposed for Clearwater County

Cannabis production facility proposed south of Caroline would produce 30,000 kg of cannabis a year

Two Central Alberta country singers are finalists in career-launching contest

They will attend music industry ‘boot camp’ this summer

Transit changes to aid Burman University students

An additional evening trip and student bus passes to be in place by fall

WATCH: Province, Maskwacis Cree Nations sign educational agreement

Funding and support will help the First Nations develop a Cree-based curriculum

WATCH: Red Deer celebrates World Refugee Day

The Central Alberta Refugee Effort hosted multiple events around Red Deer Wednesday

New Jersey Devils forward Taylor Hall wins Hart Trophy as NHL MVP

LAS VEGAS — Taylor Hall has won the Hart Trophy as the… Continue reading

Red Deer high school student psyched for SHAD

Lindsay Thurber’s Kaden Nivens will head to Newfoundland for the annual program in July

Red Deer College team tackles lack of Indigneous inclusion in research projects

A local college research team has completed a lengthy project examining the… Continue reading

Officials make case against parents accused of child abuse

RIVERSIDE, Calif. — Prosecutors made their case Wednesday against a Southern California… Continue reading

Manitoba educational assistant sentenced to 3 1/5 years for sex with student

WINNIPEG — A former educational assistant in Winnipeg has been sentenced to… Continue reading

Conservatives can ‘win anywhere,’ Scheer says in welcoming Richard Martel

OTTAWA — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer welcomed the newest member of his… Continue reading

Fans grieve as detectives search for XXXTentacion’s killers

DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla. — For hours, the fans came in a steady… Continue reading

Canadian steel not a national security threat on its own: US commerce secretary

OTTAWA — The U.S. commerce secretary says Canada is not a national… Continue reading

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month