Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Minister of Energy Sonya Savage respond to the federal approval of the Trans Mountain Pipeline in Edmonton, Alberta, on Tuesday June 18, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Amber Bracken

Who said what about the Liberals’ decision to go ahead with Trans Mountain

OTTAWA — There was swift reaction Tuesday to the decision by the Trudeau Liberals to give the go-ahead to the Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion. Here is what federal, provincial and Indigenous leaders, as well various groups had to say:

“Fundamentally, this isn’t a choice between producing more conventional energy or less. It’s a choice about where we can sell it and how we get it there safely. We strongly believe that having more options and more markets puts Canada in a stronger, strategic position to create good middle-class jobs and invest in our shared future. That is why we made today’s decision.” — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

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“We all knew he was going to approve it. What Canadians were hoping for today was a clear timeline for construction to start and he failed to be able to tell Canadians on what date construction would actually start.” — Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer

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“This is deeply concerning particularly given that those environmental concerns aren’t addressed still … and finally because the Indigenous concerns that were raised are still present.” — NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh

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“This second approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline isn’t a victory to celebrate. It’s just another step in a process that has frankly taken too long.” — Alberta Premier Jason Kenney

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“Although I regret the federal government’s decision, it’s within their authority to make that decision.” — B.C. Premier John Horgan

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“They will build a pipeline to blow through our Paris targets, use our own money to do it, and then try to trick us by saying every dollar made on this project … is going to go to clean-energy projects.” — Green Leader Elizabeth May

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“It’s clear First Nations have different positions on this project, but they all stand firm that their rights be respected and their traditional territories be protected. Only First Nations can determine if those conditions are met.” — Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde

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“After all the debates, reviews, hearings and court challenges, only one thing remains: build it now.” — Goldy Hyder, president and CEO, Business Council of Canada

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“The federal decision to buy the pipeline and become the owner makes it impossible to make an unbiased decision. … We will be appealing the decision to the Federal Court of Appeal.” — Chief Leah George-Wilson, Tsleil-Waututh First Nation

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“We’ve learned that approved is not built. What we need now is a concrete plan to get TMX and other trade-enabling infrastructure built without unnecessary legal delays.” — Aaron Henry, director of environmental and resources policy, Canadian Chamber of Commerce

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“This is far from a done deal. First Nations and Canadian environmentalists will continue to fight this project and their international allies will support them in whatever way they can.” — Patrick McCully, climate and energy program director, Rainforest Action Network

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“In order for taxpayers to be made whole for being forced to pay for the purchase and expansion of Trans Mountain, it is imperative that the Trudeau government ensure construction gets underway as soon as possible.” — Aaron Wudrick, federal director, Canadian Taxpayers Federation

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“For the Trudeau government to approve this pipeline after declaring a climate emergency makes about as much sense as pouring gasoline on a burning fire.” — Mike Hudema, climate and energy campaigner, Greenpeace Canada

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“The federal government’s approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is a positive step toward further hydrocarbon development in Canada. However, the project still faces significant political, regulatory, and judicial challenges, and ultimately we see a tremendous amount of execution risk up until the oil starts flowing.” — Gavin MacFarlane, vice-president, Moody’s Investors Service

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“More tanker traffic, increased noise and the possibility of a marine oil spill with devastating consequences for the West Coast remain concerning. One spill could spell the end of endangered orca and salmon, as well as harming bird populations.” — Jay Ritchlin, Western Canada director, David Suzuki Foundation

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