An active life’s reward

I read the news story about Red Deer becoming the only Canadian city to get attention for being an international leader in promoting active living with a grain of salt rubbed into old wounds.

I read the news story about Red Deer becoming the only Canadian city to get attention for being an international leader in promoting active living with a grain of salt rubbed into old wounds.

That’s because some of the scars are still fresh, two years after Red Deer received a national award for our pilot project on bike lanes. That whole experience (I became personally involved in assisting with the project) descended into the nastiest storm of negativity I can remember in our city.

Still, this latest trip back into the spotlight reveals how little it often takes to make big differences in how people look at us, and how we look at ourselves.

You want to know what ultimately got us that global attention? It was the fact that a good portion of our parks trail system is being kept cleared of snow through the winter.

That’s the nub of it. Of course, the nub of it is surrounded by a lot more good fruit. Inefficient or not, our multi-use trails are an important part of Red Deer’s transportation system. That’s above being an important part of our city’s recreation system — and through that, an ever-growing part of our entire city’s culture.

We built it, kept it clear for use year-round and the people came.

Here’s a side note to illustrate how our trails have become such a valuable resource for both travel and for healthy living.

It literally took years for the Central Alberta Regional Trails Society to get a paved trail built between Blackfalds and Lacombe. The barriers were tremendous — not just the physical logistics, but because of the entire culture of this region.

People want trails, just not near them — even though trails immediately enhance property values and are proven to improve the life outcomes of people who live near the trails.

With the upside so well-documented by now, landowners should be pounding on council doors for a trail extension to go near them.

But our culture has been to say no to trails — and especially to say no if tax money is to go into building them.

But the Blackfalds-Lacombe trail got built and in its first year. Guess what the biggest complaint about the trail has been? It’s that more money isn’t being spent to keep the trail clear for use year-round.

Now that we have it, Red Deer could not cease snow clearing on our city trails any more than the Trans Canada Trail network could pull out the Blackfalds-Lacombe portion of it. The benefits are just too real, too immediate, too culturally-altering, to turn back.

Global sports equipment supplier Nike is the sponsor of the Designed to Move campaign, which seeks to inspire governments at all levels to pay attention to how their policies regarding design affect people’s health, for better or for worse.

The campaign hired a consultant, 8-80 Cities, to look around the world for places where governing bodies actually notice that their actions can either promote or impede the health of their citizens. The consultants discovered that Red Deer’s trails are widely networked, integrated into our transportation plans — and heavily used.

Winter, we have found, need not be a barrier to moving ourselves outdoors for either work or play — and that got the consultant’s attention.

I paid a visit to Nike’s website (www.designedtomove.org) and found one of their primary goals is to interest children in growing to become active adults.

They have a lot of science on their side. The site opens with the premise that today’s kids may well be the first generation ever to have poorer expected life outcomes than their parents. That’s because our car-centric, computer-centric, sedentary economy has produced a large population of overweight, unfit people.

Their thesis is that if we design walking, biking, running, sports and general activity into our day-to-day lives, starting early, that the current unhealthy trend of rising obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even some cancers can be reversed.

My thesis is that if we believe that exercise is good medicine, we will find ways to take it. When a significant portion of us realize that just walking or biking to work imparts a whole host of personal and societal benefits, we will demand that our municipal councils remove the barriers that keep us from just doing it.

But the belief has to come first.

Red Deer’s status as an international leader in designing active living right from our front doors to our workplaces and all places that we gather is only deserved if it stems from a belief that a healthy lifestyle matters — for us and for all those who will live here after we’re gone.

Two years ago, we tore out the bike lanes just weeks after getting an award for them. That’s OK, if we still believe it’s important to remove the design barriers that exist now for people to live a healthy, active life.

That may end up costing us a lot more money up front than simply clearing trails in winter. But hey, it’s the gumption that wins the awards.

Greg Neiman is a retired Advocate editor. Follow his blog at readersadvocate.blogspot.ca or email greg.neiman.blog@gmail.com.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges all the empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist which is a independent pharmacy during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto, on Monday, April 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Nearly five per cent of Alberta businesses did not survive the first 10 months of the pandemic. (Black Press File photo).
Nearly 5% of Alberta businesses closed during 2020 pandemic

Will more closures happen before it’s over?

Red Deer Rebels forward Arshdeep Bains eyes a loose puck in front of the Medicine Hat Tigers net Saturday night in WHL action at the Centrium. (Photo by ROB WALLATOR/Red Deer Rebels)
Rebels fall short in 12th straight loss

Tigers 5 Rebels 2 (Saturday) Tigers 3 Rebels 2 (Monday) The Red… Continue reading

Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and vacation bookings are being increased in B.C. (B.C. government)
COVID-19: B.C. announces signage along Alberta border to discourage non-essential travel

B.C. extends COVID-19 indoor dining, group fitness ban until May 25

Red Deer property owners will receive their 2019 property assessment notices in the next few days.  (File photo by Advocate staff)
Red Deer awaiting more details on how federal budget impacts city

The City of Red Deer is awaiting more information on how much… Continue reading

A vial of the Medicago vaccine sits on a surface. CARe Clinic, located in Red Deer, has been selected to participate in the third phase of vaccine study. (Photo courtesy www.medicago.com)
Red Deer clinical research centre participating in plant-based COVID-19 vaccine trial

A Red Deer research centre has been selected to participate in the… Continue reading

Letters
Letter: Restrictions have nothing to do with religion

Many have framed the closure of GraceLife Church near Edmonton by Alberta… Continue reading

LtE bug
Letter: Thanking volunteers in Red Deer

National Volunteer Week is April 18 to 24. At the Canadian Cancer… Continue reading

Letter to the editor
Letter: Good on MLAs for speaking out

This is a letter in regard to MLAs not standing united behind… Continue reading

Treena Mielke
Family: Happiness can be found in many ways

I’ve heard it said that necessity is the mother of invention. I… Continue reading

Ottawa Senators' Connor Brown, right, scores on Calgary Flames goalie Jacob Markstrom during second-period NHL hockey action in Calgary, Alta., Monday, April 19, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Connor Brown scores twice for Ottawa Senators in 4-2 win over Calgary Flames

Connor Brown scores twice for Ottawa Senators in 4-2 win over Calgary Flames

Canada head coach Bev Priestman reacts during the women's international friendly soccer match between England and Canada at Bet365 stadium in Stoke on Trent, England, Tuesday, April 13, 2021. Priestman says her goal is to help Canada move up the Olympic podium after back-to-back bronze medals at the 2012 and 2016 Games. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Rui Vieira
Olympic soccer draw will allow Canadians to start planning on and off the pitch

Olympic soccer draw will allow Canadians to start planning on and off the pitch

Federal government’s extension of CEWS in budget is some good news for CFL franchises

Federal government’s extension of CEWS in budget is some good news for CFL franchises

Canada's Brendan Bottcher dropped a 6-3 decision to Scotland's Bruce Mouat in the men's final of the Humpty's Champions Cup. Bottcher makes a shot against Scotland at the Men's World Curling Championships in Calgary, Alta., Friday, April 9, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Mixed results for Canadian teams at Champions Cup as Homan wins, Bottcher loses

Mixed results for Canadian teams at Champions Cup as Homan wins, Bottcher loses

Most Read