Column: Coyote Tales

Sharing indigenous culture and community in Red Deer

I love being Canadian. I’m proud to be a Blackfeet-Métis woman. I’m proud to wear a flag patch when I travel to other countries. I like being accused of being too polite. I recognize that the virtues attributed to Canadians come from the original teachings of First People who lived on this land a long time ago. I believe that the seven sacred teachings of respect, honesty, humility, love, wisdom, truth, and courage are the reason that the indigenous people have survived the impact of colonization, treaty making, the residential school era (1886-1996) and the 60s scoop that separated our children from their land, their families and their culture. It is these teachings that enable us to heal and to be willing to sit in circles of truth and reconciliation. We’ve survived, but I also see signs that we are beginning to thrive again. I hope that together we can explore these topics more and build a deeper understanding of Canada’s history and gain a new awareness about the indigenous people and their contributions that make Canada the great place we call home.

Through this column, it is the intention of Red Deer Native Friendship Society to share its indigenous culture with you. One of our main teachers is Coyote, sometimes called the Trickster. I think I’m a little like a coyote in that I can be like an irritating pup “nipping at the heels” of bureaucratic white tape until it brings some sort of action. I’ll try to share some of my experiences in a way that will make you laugh out loud, and maybe make you angry enough to stand with the indigenous community to right past wrongs. Unlike Wile E. Coyote (from Road Runner) our coyote stories provide messages about how to learn from our mistakes and always have an underlying moral message that enables us to live in greater harmony as members of our community.

There are so many wonderful stories that took place on this land and I am grateful for the opportunity to share the rich indigenous culture and stories with the citizens of Red Deer through this column. You are to submit questions to me and I’ll do my best to find the answers and introduce you some of the amazing Indigenous people that are making Red deer home. Thank you for making time to join this circle of sharing.

Tanya Ward-Schur is the executive director of the Red Deer Native Friendship Society

Just Posted

Witnesses describe scene of fatal 2016 collision

Delburne man on trial for manslaughter after being accused of causing collision

New housing for seniors under construction in Innisfail

60 lodge units and 30 self-contained apartments

Red Deer student excels: 11 year old hosts fundraiser to help kids

A Red Deer youngster is like most students, with a few exceptions:… Continue reading

WATCH: CP Holiday Train rolls into Lacombe

Kelly Prescott performed for hundreds of Central Albertans

WATCH: CP Holiday Train rolls into Lacombe

Kelly Prescott performed for hundreds of Central Albertans

Dumba scores twice, Wild rout Canadiens 7-1

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Reeling and banged up, the Minnesota Wild were… Continue reading

Coach Hunter wants up-tempo Team Canada as world junior squad hits ice

COLWOOD, B.C. — Team Canada coach Tim Hunter says the team that… Continue reading

Study finds female-led films outperform male ones

NEW YORK — A study organized by Time’s Up, the organization formed… Continue reading

Price Is Right contestant wins winter trip to Winnipeg, Churchill

WINNIPEG — Who wants to visit Winnipeg in the dead of winter?… Continue reading

CBC Gem streaming service to launch exclusive content, partners with Wattpad

TORONTO — The CBC has launched a new streaming service featuring live… Continue reading

‘Part of the solution:’ Alberta seeks proposals to build new refinery

EDMONTON — Alberta is looking for someone to build a new oil… Continue reading

Online ads spoil Christmas surprises, raising privacy concerns: experts

Lisa Clyburn knew she had found the perfect gift for her nine-year-old… Continue reading

Most Read