Quebec protestors just spoiled brats

The Quebec students’ strike just won’t go away. Stories typically get stale in a hurry, but these bozos have managed to embarrass themselves for many weeks as they give a black eye to an entire generation and province. Who knew that Quebec had such low tuition fees for its pampered post-secondary students before the current riots?

The Quebec students’ strike just won’t go away.

Stories typically get stale in a hurry, but these bozos have managed to embarrass themselves for many weeks as they give a black eye to an entire generation and province. Who knew that Quebec had such low tuition fees for its pampered post-secondary students before the current riots?

The net result is another generation of entitlement in a province where large transfer payments from generous Confederation partners like Alberta go to die in a place where the other provinces’ largesse is typically neither acknowledged nor appreciated by its recipients.

Somehow a crew of self-centered junior anarchists managed to hijack the futures of many of their fellow Quebec university students and brought the universities to their knees because they do not want to pay higher tuition fees. Bear in mind that their higher tuition fees would still fall well short of the current average annual tuition fees in the rest of Canada, even after they are implemented over several years.

They have hijacked an entire school term for the cause, a specious cause that is rife with self-indulgent greed and an embarrassing lack of depth.

I was once a university student and I also suffered from a typical affliction found in many first- and second-year university students: for a brief moment, I actually believed that a few post-secondary courses gave me an intellectual edge on the rest of the world. Most university students will eventually grow up and realize that a few university courses are an accurate measurement of brains and ability, and that most students are not nearly as vital to a better and brighter future world as presented by their own delusions.

Somehow these clowns in Quebec have decided not to grow up and accept any portion of adulthood. They have vandalized and intimidated their way to a point where a little adult supervision is desperately needed — preferably within the penal system, where a brand new world of discipline and unpleasant punishment awaits them.

These cartoonish protestors have destroyed a semester for many students and hijacked the future post-graduate plans for some. Their juvenile temper tantrums have managed to delay other students’ rights to move into young adulthood as net contributors to society.

I can’t even imagine what it would be like to have a herd of these jackasses enter my classroom and shut down my education because the mean government people want these lowlifes to pay a higher fraction of what every other student in Canada pays for their education.

The closest that I have come to irresponsible classroom behaviour was a giant second-year U of C class that held several hundred students. The mood in that room was a little high school-ish and contained many immature students who had no interest in the class. It was a loud, rude and annoying place until an older guy stood up and screamed; ”I think I speak for everybody in here who doesn’t live with Mommy and Daddy and doesn’t get an allowance to go to university — Shut the (insert famous expletive here) up!”

He received a loud standing ovation from me and every other student paying his own way. The professor thanked him and I would have helped carry him out on my shoulders that day because the theatre was a quiet model of decorum after that day. It was a beautiful moment.

I think that classroom hero would have been an even tougher audience for self-important little punks to explain why they have the right to hijack his education process, had he been a student in 2012 Quebec.

Jim Sutherland is a local freelance writer. He can be reached at jim@mystarcollectorcar.com.

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