Street Tales: Neglectful parents should be charged

Many years ago, there was a farm family out west of here that had several children.

That was at a time when not a lot of attention was paid to the safe storage of chemicals. Yes, they were stored up on a shelf mostly out of reach, but usually, there was no separate containment.

Even though the children were disciplined about staying safe for the most part, one of the young boys during play time went into the barn, and being curious, found a can with pictures on it, opened it up and proceeded to put some of the powder into his mouth and swallow some of it, before he came to the realization that lye really was not edible.

It burned his mouth, his throat, and even a small portion went into his lungs; something that he still suffers from today. It was so long ago, and I was quite young, so a lot of information was not given to us kids, except extra strong warnings about not to touch or even handle products we knew nothing about.

I do remember a lot of sympathy for the child, but also for the parents for the pain they were going through. Apologetic as they might have been, they were still subject to a lot of criticism for their unsafe handling of a poisonous chemical.

Then a few days ago, I read a headline on MSN News about two children taken to hospital for observation and possible treatment for ingesting cannabis candies. The kids as it turned out, are OK, but when they acted high, the parents got scared and phoned 911.

Two statements in the article really made me sit up and take notice.

First, was the statement that “it is not known how the candies got into the house.” Was it the parents who brought them in, or perhaps the kids got them elsewhere and brought them home?

However they got there, it shows that there was a lack of due diligence in the proper storage of them, wherever it was. If they were brought in by the parents, then the next statement is almost ridiculous. It read, “It is not known whether or not any charges should be laid in this case.”

For sure, the new Cannabis Act did not protect them, nor did their parents, and at this point, it is not known whether or not this will have any kind of lasting effect on the kids. On the surface probably not, but it reveals a problem that many people have predicted all along during this legalization process — that drugs would fall into the hands of children.

The Cannabis Act aside, exactly what did people expect when they promoted putting this substance into food products such as candies and cookies?

Furthermore, who would control the amount in each product? If my growing up years are any indication, anything that even remotely looked like a candy or another kind of sweet stood no chance of survival much beyond my noticing them.

The Pandora’s Box of drugs has just been opened, and already we are seeing some of the negative results, as well as the possible dangers. So, how do we respond?

I feel that if the parents brought these candies into the house, and the government is as dedicated to using the Cannabis Act as intended as they were about the legalization, then yes, for sure, they should be charged with child endangerment or some such charge.

How else will this garbage be kept out of the hands of children?

We knew it was coming, much like a speeding train — just not fully appreciating the potential danger. And now, sure enough, it just happened again.

Chris Salomons is a retired Red Deer resident with a concern for the downtrodden.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberta has 3,651 active cases of COVID-19. (File photo)
432 new COVID cases sets another record Friday

Central zone holds steady at 126 active cases

A Red Deer County man was arrested for drug possession by Innisfail RCMP on April 19. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Property crime and drugs top Red Deer RCMP priorities in new plan

2020-2022 Policing Priorities Plan going to city council on Monday

RCMP estimate about 500 people gathered on the weekend near Garrington Bridge along the Red Deer River, in a July 28, 2020 story. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Second person charged for alleged assault at anti-racism rally in Red Deer

A second person is facing charges following an alleged assault during an… Continue reading

Alberta Union of Provincial Employees vice-president Bonnie Gustola criticized provincial government layoffs at a rally that drew more than 80 people at City Hall Park on Friday.
Photo by PAUL COWLEY/Advocate staff
More than 80 rally in Red Deer against government health, education cutbacks

Rally at City Hall Park organized by the Council for Canadians

The higher the education level, the higher the income of some 1.3 million post-secondary graduates surveyed between 2010 and 2015, with master's degrees paying off the most. But the findings also suggest that gender and timing matter. (Black Press Media File).
2020 high school grads won’t get their ceremony

Decision announced by Lindsay Thurber and Hunting Hills high schools, and Gateway Christian School

B.C. Liberal leader Andrew Wilkinson, B.C. NDP leader John Horgan and B.C. Greens leader Sonia Furstenau. (Black Press Media)
VIDEO: One day until B.C. voters go to the polls in snap election defined by pandemic

NDP Leader John Horgan’s decision to call an election comes more than a year ahead of schedule and during a pandemic

Alice Kolisnyk, deputy director of the Red Deer Food Bank, says the agency expects an increase in demand as the COVID-19 pandemic continues. Every new subscription to the Red Deer Advocate includes a $50 donation to the food bank. (Photo by BYRON HACKETT/Advocate Staff)
Support the food bank with a subscription to the Red Deer Advocate

The community’s most vulnerable members are always in need of a hand,… Continue reading

New voluntary measures, including the encouragement of more mask wearing, have been introduced in the Edmonton health zone. “Red Deer has been very fortunate to have relatively low case numbers . . . relative to the rest of the province and the country,” says Mayor Tara Veer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
POLL: Should Alberta have stricter rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19?

Should Alberta have stricter rules to help prevent the spread of COVID-19?… Continue reading

Mariah Bell of the United States, competes during women's short program in the International Skating Union Grand Prix of Figure Skating Series, Friday, Oct. 23, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/David Becker)
Nathan Chen dominates again in Skate America short program

Nathan Chen dominates again in Skate America short program

Lanto Griffin putts on the ninth hole during the second round of the Zozo Championship golf tournament Friday, Oct. 23, 2020, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Thomas has a fast start for a 65 and a 1-shot lead at Zozo

Thomas has a fast start for a 65 and a 1-shot lead at Zozo

Mariah Bell of the United States, competes during women's short program in the International Skating Union Grand Prix of Figure Skating Series, Friday, Oct. 23, 2020, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/David Becker)
Bell, Tennell go 1-2 in Skate America short program

Bell, Tennell go 1-2 in Skate America short program

Team Saskatchewan skip Matt Dunstone flips his broom in frustration following a shot as they take on Team Alberta in the playoffs at the Brier in Kingston, Ont., on Saturday, March 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Team Matt Dunstone considers relocation due to restrictions in Saskatchewan

Team Matt Dunstone considers relocation due to restrictions in Saskatchewan

Police in Ottawa are investigating an incident of hate-motivated graffiti at the National War Memorial. The alleged incident happened last Friday night, when police say a man, shown in a police handout photo, used a sharp object to engrave a hateful message on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. THE CANADIAN PRESSS/HO-Ottawa Police Service MANDATORY CREDIT
Ottawa police investigating hate-motivated graffiti incident at National War Memorial

Ottawa police investigating hate-motivated graffiti incident at National War Memorial

Indigenous fisherman Robert Syliboy stands on the wharf in Saulnierville, N.S. on Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020. Tensions remain high over an Indigenous-led lobster fishery that has been the source of conflict with non-Indigenous fishermen. THE CANADIAN PRESS /Andrew Vaughan
For Mi’kmaq fishers, dreams of a peaceful harvest on N.S. waters repeatedly dashed

For Mi’kmaq fishers, dreams of a peaceful harvest on N.S. waters repeatedly dashed

Most Read