The bus returning the University of Alberta Pandas hockey to Edmonton from a game in Calgary on Nov. 24 clipped a semi that was pulled over on the highway. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

The bus returning the University of Alberta Pandas hockey to Edmonton from a game in Calgary on Nov. 24 clipped a semi that was pulled over on the highway. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)

‘First thing you think about is Humboldt:’ Women hockey players recall crash

EDMONTON — For the first couple of minutes after the crash, no one on the University of Alberta Pandas hockey team bus knew what had happened.

Captain Cayle Dillon heard a big boom and felt the cold.

Abby Benning, who plays defence, heard a pop, then glass breaking and what sounded like marbles hitting the floor.

Goalie Kirsten Chamberlin, who had music blasting through her earphones, said everything looked white.

“It was pretty scary. It was pretty crazy to think it happened, that we got into an accident,” said Dillon, who also plays defence.

The women were returning to Edmonton from a game in Calgary about 1:30 a.m. on Nov. 24 when their chartered bus clipped a semi that was pulled over on the highway.

“The first thing you think about is Humboldt,” recalled Chamberlin, 20.

Sixteen people — including 10 players and the head coach — were killed and 13 players were injured in April when a semi and a bus carrying the Humboldt Broncos of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League collided at a rural crossroads.

Dillon, 21, went to high school with one of the injured players, Derek Patter, who’s back with the Broncos this season.

Benning knew two of the players who died — Jaxon Joseph and Stephen Wack — through school and hockey in the Edmonton area.

“What are the odds?” Benning said. “When I clued into what was actually happening, I thought this is what the boys heard when they were on the bus. This is how they felt.

“I’m not trying to be over-dramatic but it felt like we were going to die because nobody knew what was happening.”

Coach Howie Draper and some of the players had cuts on their faces. Two teammates were taken to hospital with minor injuries, including glass in their eyes.

Everyone is back on the ice now and some players are adding their voices to a call from some Broncos parents for mandatory seatbelts on team buses.

“It’s a pretty easy thing to do that can save your life,” said Chamberlin.

There have been no changes by Hockey Canada, the national governing body for the sport. But some leagues, including the Saskatchewan junior league, have made seatbelt use a priority.

Several teams have already made it a habit to wear seatbelts on buses and tweet under the #buckleupforthebroncos hashtag.

The movement grew after Tricia Wack, whose son Stephen died in the Broncos crash, wrote an opinion piece that ran in newspapers across the country.

Former NHLer Chris Joseph, who lost his son Jaxon, has also said he’d like to see regular seatbelt use on buses.

“It’s crazy. We all are comfortable wearing seatbelts in cars. We don’t mind wearing seatbelts on airplanes. Yet somehow we get on a bus and feel like we’re safe,” he said.

The issue was also raised after a fatal bus crash involving the Swift Current Broncos of the Western Hockey League in 1986.

Four players were killed when the bus hit a patch of black ice, struck an approach and landed on its side. Many of the 24 others on the bus were injured.

A coroner’s inquest report, which was obtained through a freedom-of-information request, said three of the four died from spinal injuries they received when they were thrown upwards into the roof of the bus. The fourth died when he was crushed by the bus.

The coroner recommended that legislation be enacted that would require team buses to be equipped with seatbelts and would ensure they were used.

But there was no followup and there have been no changes at the provincial level since the Humboldt crash. The federal government announced in June that all newly built highway buses will be required to have seatbelts by September 2020.

Some charter bus companies point out that many new buses already have seatbelts, but there is no way to ensure everyone is wearing them.

On the night of the Pandas crash, most team members were wearing seatbelts when the bus left Calgary because the roads were icy, Benning said.

“We’ve made the Calgary road trip so many times,” she said. “Everyone was trying to get some sleep … so some of the girls for sure took seatbelts off trying to get cosy.”

She and the others expect they will make it a habit and try to get the word out to other players.

“You don’t think it’s going to happen to your team or your friends or your family, but that’s not how the world works,” Chamberlin said.

“It’s just luck of the draw.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A dealer slides chips across a blackjack table on Friday, March 16, 2012, in Bangor, Maine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Robert F. Bukaty
Great Canadian Gaming CEO resigns after travel to Yukon: media reports

Couple intercepted at the Whitehorse airport trying to leave Yukon

Whistle Stop Cafe owner Christopher Scott and his sister Melodie are serving sit-down customers in their Mirror diner to protest health restrictions that they say are unfair to restaurants and other small businesses. Photo by PAUL COWLEY/Advocate staff
Central Alberta restaurant owner defies health restrictions by serving diners

Whistle Stop Cafe owner says pandemic restrictions unfair to restaurants and small businesses

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

Canadian clothing line Rubies specializes in form-fitting clothing for trans and non-binary girls. (Photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS)
Toronto father-daughter duo design swimsuit tailored to transgender children

A Canadian clothing line is helping transgender kids feel confident at the… Continue reading

Toronto Maple Leafs alumni George Armstrong, right, and son of Maple Leafs alumni Syl Apps, Syl Apps Jr., shake hands during a pre-game ceremony before the Toronto Maple Leafs and Winnipeg Jets NHL game in Toronto on February 21, 2015. George Armstrong, who captained the Toronto Maple Leafs to four Stanley Cups in the '60s and wore the blue and white his entire career, has died. He was 90. The Maple Leafs confirmed the death Sunday on Twitter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese
Former Maple Leafs captain George Armstrong dies

Former Maple Leafs captain George Armstrong dies

Green Bay Packers' Adrian Amos pauses after losing the NFC championship NFL football game to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Green Bay, Wis., Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021. The Buccaneers defeated the Packers 31-26 to advance to the Super Bowl. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)
Aaron Rodgers’ ‘uncertain’ future hangs over Green Bay

Aaron Rodgers’ ‘uncertain’ future hangs over Green Bay

Toronto Argonauts head coach Scott Milanovich calls the plays on the sideline against Winnipeg Blue Bombers during the first half of CFL action in Winnipeg on August 14, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods
Scott Milanovich steps down as Edmonton’s head coach to pursue opportunities in NFL

Scott Milanovich steps down as Edmonton’s head coach to pursue opportunities in NFL

Toronto Raptors guard Fred VanVleet (23) goes under Indiana Pacers guards Malcolm Brogdon (7) and Jeremy Lamb (26) to shoot during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Indianapolis, Monday, Jan. 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Michael Conroy
Brogdon scores 36 points to lead Pacers over Toronto Raptors

Brogdon scores 36 points to lead Pacers over Toronto Raptors

FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2020, file photo, baseballs occupy a bucket after use during fielding practice during spring training baseball workouts for pitchers and catchers at Cleveland Indians camp in Avondale, Ariz. Major League Baseball is suspending all political contributions in the wake of last week's invasion of the U.S. Capitol by a mob loyal to President Donald Trump, joining a wave of major corporations rethinking their efforts to lobby Washington. “In light of the unprecedented events last week at the U.S. Capitol, MLB is suspending contributions from its Political Action Committee pending a review of our political contribution policy going forward,” the league said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
Cactus League asks MLB to delay spring training due to COVID

Cactus League asks MLB to delay spring training due to COVID

Patrick Cantlay, right, bumps fists with Andrew Putman before teeing off on the first hole during the final round of The American Express golf tournament on the Pete Dye Stadium Course at PGA West Sunday, Jan. 24, 2021, in La Quinta, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Si Woo Kim holds off Cantlay to win The American Express

Si Woo Kim holds off Cantlay to win The American Express

Most Read