Several months in Canadian jail for ex-NHLer Mike Danton before any parole

Former NHL player Mike Danton will likely spend at least several months in Canadian custody even though his time in an American prison for a failed murder-for-hire plot has made him eligible for parole, correctional officials said Wednesday.

Mike Danton

TORONTO — Former NHL player Mike Danton will likely spend at least several months in Canadian custody even though his time in an American prison for a failed murder-for-hire plot has made him eligible for parole, correctional officials said Wednesday.

Danton, a native of Brampton, Ont., pleaded guilty in November 2004 in a plot that allegedly targeted his former agent, David Frost, and was sentenced to 7 1/2 years in a U.S. federal prison.

The American sentence translates to six years, two months and 14 days, said Holly Knowles, spokeswoman with Correctional Services Canada.

“Essentially, he’s subject to Canadian law now, which means there can be changes in terms of the sentencing length,” Knowles said. “According to our sentences, he has reached his (parole) eligibility date.”

Danton had been petitioning for transfer to a Canadian prison since 2005 and was transferred to an assessment centre in the Kingston, Ont., area on March 19, the date he reached full parole eligibility.

Carol Sparling, a spokeswoman for the National Parole Board, said no dates have been set for a hearing but added a review was automatic given the almost 4 1/2 years Danton served in the U.S.

“When someone is past their full parole eligibility date, the board is required to conduct a hearing — the offender doesn’t have to make an application,” Sparling said.

Danton could possibly waive his right to parole.

In any event, correctional services would first make a “thorough assessment” of his case for presenting to the parole board.

Such an evaluation could include risk and psychological assessments as well as checking with the community Frost might hope to live in after his release to see what kind of housing or employment supports he might have.

“It does take time to prepare,” Knowles said.

“I would definitely say a period of a few months is appropriate.”

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