Internet and Telecom

The Rogers logo is photographed in Toronto on Monday, September 30, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin

CRTC hearings to begin on proposed Rogers Communications deal to buy Shaw

Regulator to consider the impact on competition in broadcasting landscape

The Rogers logo is photographed in Toronto on Monday, September 30, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin
Rogers Communications CEO Joe Natale speaks to shareholders during the Rogers annual general meeting in Toronto on Friday, April 20, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Exit of Rogers CEO prompts questions about the telecom giant’s direction

Exit of Rogers CEO prompts questions about the telecom giant’s direction

Rogers Communications CEO Joe Natale speaks to shareholders during the Rogers annual general meeting in Toronto on Friday, April 20, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

CRTC to require telecom providers to implement call authentification

CRTC to require telecom providers to implement call authentification

FILE - This combo of photos shows the logo for Google, top, and Apple, bottom. Big Tech companies that operate around the globe have long promised both to obey local laws and to protect civil rights while doing business. But when Apple and Google capitulated to Russian demands and removed Smart Voting, a political-opposition app from their local app stores, it raised worries that two of the world’s most successful companies are more comfortable bowing to undemocratic edicts — and maintaining a steady flow of profits— than upholding their stated principles.((AP Photo/File)

Apple, Google raise new concerns by yanking Russian app

Smart Voting was a tool for organizing opposition to Russia President Vladimir Putin

  • Sep 22, 2021
FILE - This combo of photos shows the logo for Google, top, and Apple, bottom. Big Tech companies that operate around the globe have long promised both to obey local laws and to protect civil rights while doing business. But when Apple and Google capitulated to Russian demands and removed Smart Voting, a political-opposition app from their local app stores, it raised worries that two of the world’s most successful companies are more comfortable bowing to undemocratic edicts — and maintaining a steady flow of profits— than upholding their stated principles.((AP Photo/File)
A woman holds two cellphones in this photo illustration, Monday, March 29, 2021, in Chelsea, Que. The Competition Bureau is seeking records and information from four of Canada’s largest telecom service providers as part of their review of a proposed takeover of Shaw Communications Inc. by Rogers Communications Inc. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Competition Bureau seeking info from telecom companies for Rogers-Shaw deal review

Difficult to say how much longer the investigation will take

A woman holds two cellphones in this photo illustration, Monday, March 29, 2021, in Chelsea, Que. The Competition Bureau is seeking records and information from four of Canada’s largest telecom service providers as part of their review of a proposed takeover of Shaw Communications Inc. by Rogers Communications Inc. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
FILE - This Tuesday, July 28, 2020, file photo shows the icon for the Tinder dating app on a device in New York. The use of dating apps in the last 18 months of the pandemic has surged around the globe. Tinder reported 2020 as its busiest year. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)

Dating changed during the pandemic; apps are following suit

Tinder reported that 2020 was its busiest year yet

  • Aug 3, 2021
FILE - This Tuesday, July 28, 2020, file photo shows the icon for the Tinder dating app on a device in New York. The use of dating apps in the last 18 months of the pandemic has surged around the globe. Tinder reported 2020 as its busiest year. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison, File)
Hands type on a keyboard in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, December, 19, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Banks, business websites up again after reporting technical difficulties

Banks, business websites up again after reporting technical difficulties

Hands type on a keyboard in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, December, 19, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The Cogeco logo is seen in Montreal on Thursday, October 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Cogeco Communications preparing to expand its high-speed internet footprint

Cogeco Communications preparing to expand its high-speed internet footprint

The Cogeco logo is seen in Montreal on Thursday, October 22, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson
A woman walks past the signage of Freedom Mobile, in Toronto on Thursday, November 24, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
A woman walks past the signage of Freedom Mobile, in Toronto on Thursday, November 24, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
FILE - This Jan. 17, 2001 file photo shows people entering CNN Center, the headquarters for CNN, in downtown Atlanta. Numerous websites were unavailable on Tuesday June 8, 2021, after an apparent widespread outage at cloud service company Fastly. Dozens of high-traffic websites including the New York Times, CNN, Twitch and the U.K. government’s home page, could not be reached. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)

Global glitch: Swaths of internet go down after cloud outage

Down Detector, which tracks internet outages, posted reports on dozens of sites going down

  • Jun 8, 2021
FILE - This Jan. 17, 2001 file photo shows people entering CNN Center, the headquarters for CNN, in downtown Atlanta. Numerous websites were unavailable on Tuesday June 8, 2021, after an apparent widespread outage at cloud service company Fastly. Dozens of high-traffic websites including the New York Times, CNN, Twitch and the U.K. government’s home page, could not be reached. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
A person works on a laptop in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017 file photo. Companies face a June 30 deadline to confirm they are complying with Ontario's new standards for making websites accessible for people with disabilities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Elise Amendola

Companies under pressure to comply with Ontario’s new website accessibility rules

Companies under pressure to comply with Ontario’s new website accessibility rules

A person works on a laptop in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017 file photo. Companies face a June 30 deadline to confirm they are complying with Ontario's new standards for making websites accessible for people with disabilities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Elise Amendola
A person navigates to the on-line social-media pages of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on a cellphone in Ottawa on Monday, May 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

CRTC backtracks on wholesale internet rates, reverts to 2016 levels

CRTC backtracks on wholesale internet rates, reverts to 2016 levels

A person navigates to the on-line social-media pages of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) on a cellphone in Ottawa on Monday, May 17, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A woman uses her computer key board to type while surfing the internet in North Vancovuer, B.C., on Wednesday, December, 19, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Independent internet providers prepare to raise prices in wake of CRTC decision

Independent internet providers prepare to raise prices in wake of CRTC decision

A woman uses her computer key board to type while surfing the internet in North Vancovuer, B.C., on Wednesday, December, 19, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
The Rogers Logo is photographed on a Toronto office on Monday, September 30, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

Rogers says wireless service fully restored after daylong nationwide outage

Wireless interruption had deep economic implications

The Rogers Logo is photographed on a Toronto office on Monday, September 30, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin
A cell tower is pictured in rural Ontario on Wednesday, July 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A cell tower is pictured in rural Ontario on Wednesday, July 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
TELUS recommends that customers never volunteer personal, or sensitive information, like banking or credit card account numbers, passwords, or social insurance number. (File photo)
TELUS recommends that customers never volunteer personal, or sensitive information, like banking or credit card account numbers, passwords, or social insurance number. (File photo)
A woman walks past the new rebranding sign of Freedom Mobile in Toronto on November 24, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Absence of Freedom Mobile in 5G auction increases competition concerns for MPs

Widespread concerns about the state of competition in Canada’s telecommunications industry

A woman walks past the new rebranding sign of Freedom Mobile in Toronto on November 24, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
The Rogers Communications sign is marks the company's headquarters in Toronto, April 25, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

MPs hammer Shaw, Rogers executives about proposed combination of telecom carriers

MPs hammer Shaw, Rogers executives about proposed combination of telecom carriers

The Rogers Communications sign is marks the company's headquarters in Toronto, April 25, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim
The Rogers Communications sign that marks the company’s headquarters in Toronto, April 25, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

MPs set to scrutinize Rogers takeover of Shaw in virtual hearings

Critics fear that prices will go up and service quality will go down

The Rogers Communications sign that marks the company’s headquarters in Toronto, April 25, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim
The Rogers logo is photographed in Toronto on Monday, September 30, 2019. Rogers Communications Inc. has signed a deal to buy Shaw Communications Inc. in a deal valued at $26 billion, including debt. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin

Rogers Communications signs deal to buy Shaw Communications in deal valued at $26B

Rogers to create new $1-billion fund dedicated to high-speed internet service to Western Canada

The Rogers logo is photographed in Toronto on Monday, September 30, 2019. Rogers Communications Inc. has signed a deal to buy Shaw Communications Inc. in a deal valued at $26 billion, including debt. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tijana Martin