Agencies can learn from starved boy’s tragic death, inquest told

A five-year-old boy who starved to death in his grandparents’ Toronto home didn’t just slip through one crack, but through a whole institutional safety net, lawyers at a coroner’s inquest suggested Tuesday.

TORONTO — A five-year-old boy who starved to death in his grandparents’ Toronto home didn’t just slip through one crack, but through a whole institutional safety net, lawyers at a coroner’s inquest suggested Tuesday.

The jury at the inquest into the death of five-year-old Jeffrey Baldwin heard dozens of proposed recommendations aimed at various ministries and agencies during closing submissions.

The suggestions, which the jury can choose whether to adopt as part of its verdict, pointed to more than just one reason that Jeffrey died severely malnourished, unable to lift his own head, locked in a cold, putrid bedroom. Rather, they indicate a constellation of institutional and personal failures.

“Jeffrey Baldwin received far more attention after his death than he ever did in his life,” said coroner’s counsel Jill Witkin as she presented 74 recommendations jointly suggested by various groups with standing at the inquest.

“Tragically, as you know, he was not given the freedom and opportunities that children in our society deserve. He died as a child neglected by his caregivers and shielded from the organizations out there that could protect him.”

The recommendations — which included using Jeffrey’s story as a case study for training children’s aid workers, implementing better information sharing across agencies involved with child protection and starting a public awareness campaign about people’s duty to report suspected child abuse or neglect — can help prevent deaths like Jeffrey’s in the future, Witkin said.

Just Posted

Red Deer city council aims to force larger non-profits to become more accountable

New bylaw defines which not-for-profits must pay for a business licence

Red Deer city council will seek public input on portable signage March 4

Council gave initial approval to retaining 100-metre separation distance

Smaller, more affordable, lots wanted in Red Deer’s Evergreen neighbourhood

Council approves first reading of requested lot-size changes

RDC’s new name to be unveiled in February

The next big milestone for Red Deer College is a new name,… Continue reading

Lacombe considering licensing cats

Council is expected to take a look at cat potential licensing regulations next month

2-for-1: Total lunar eclipse comes with supermoon bonus

On Sunday night, the moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the eclipse, which was visible throughout North and South America

Opinion: Faith in immigration must be preserved

Canada has a deserved reputation for extending its arms to newcomers, but… Continue reading

Olympian Adam van Koeverden wins federal Liberal nomination in Ontario riding

MILTON, Ont. — Former Olympic flag-bearer Adam van Koeverden will be carrying… Continue reading

World champion Osmond says it’s “really nice” not to know what future holds

SAINT JOHN, N.B. — Kaetlyn Osmond has a world title, Olympic medals… Continue reading

World economy forecast to slow in 2019 amid trade tensions

For Canada, the IMF’s estimate for growth in 2019 was 1.9 per cent, down from expected global growth of 3.5 per cent

Timberlake pops in on patients at Texas children’s hospital

DALLAS — Justin Timberlake has pulled some sunshine from his pocket for… Continue reading

UK police speak to Prince Philip about not wearing seatbelt

LONDON — British police have spoken with Prince Philip after the husband… Continue reading

‘Gotti’ leads Razzie nominations, Trump up for worst actor

The nominations were announced on Monday, Jan. 21 with some movies earning up to six nominations

Curtain rising Sunday night on total lunar eclipse

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — The celestial curtain will be rising soon on… Continue reading

Most Read