Beware: evolution theory is scientifically bankrupt

Gerry Feehan’s travel article on the Galapagos (Advocate, May 16) was fascinating, and the photos were great.

Gerry Feehan’s travel article on the Galapagos (Advocate, May 16) was fascinating, and the photos were great.

But his Darwinist interpretation of the island’s spectacular life forms should have included a little more of what Charles Darwin, himself, had to say about his theory: “… by this theory, innumerable transitional forms must have existed. Why do we not find them imbedded in the crust of the earth? Why is all nature not in confusion instead of being as we see them, well defined species? Geological research does not yield the infinitely many fine gradations between past and present species required by the theory; and this is the most obvious of the many objections which may be argued against it.”

What Darwin observed on the Galapagos were finches with various beaks. And yes, natural selection or “survival of the fittest,” is a good explanation of why this is so.

But this has nothing to do with evolution over millions of years.

It is simply variation within a kind, otherwise called speciation.

It did not take millions of years to breed our cattle, cats or corn to produce the characteristics we so enjoy today.

It took only a few decades, if that.

The point is, the kinds of birds, tortoises, and iguanas seen by Darwin, and Feehan, on the Galapagos, were the same kinds created by God on day five and six in the first week which He created the universe, just a few thousand years ago.

They may have adapted, within the limitations of the DNA which they contained, but they are still the birds, tortoises and iguanas as originally made by their Creator. If Feehan would warn us about reading his article “if you believe the world is only 6,000 years old,” I would caution him about swallowing a theory that, despite its popularity, is scientifically bankrupt.

Barry Beukema

Lacombe

Just Posted

The City of Red Deer is reaching out to the community to see if anyone wants to move and maintain the Scout Hut from 1937. The land it sits on is needed for a women’s shelter expansion. (Photo by LANA MICHELIN/Advocate staff).
City of Red Deer is calling for proposals for preserving, moving Scout Hut

The 47th Avenue land it sits on is needed for women’s shelter expansion

Students at Olds College will be learning what’s new in agricultural technology at the facility’s Smart Farm. (Photo contributed)
New agricultural technologies explored by students at Olds College

Olds College is launching a new SmartFarm program to help farmers and… Continue reading

Red Deer Rebels forward Zach Smith tips a shot off the post against Edmonton Oil Kings netminder Sebastian Cossa Saturday night at the Centrium. (Photo by BYRON HACKETT/Advocate Staff)
Rebels name new assistant coach, open WHL season on Oct. 1

Rebels will play home opener on Oct. 2

Bobby-Jo Stannard, community development superintendent with the City of Red Deer, and Kelly Andres, city community facilitator, say response to the first mural has been extremely positive. (Photo by SUSAN ZIELINSKI/Advocate staff)
Mural artists making downtown Red Deer vibrant

Preparing for Meet the Street arts and culture festival

Softwood lumber is pictured in Richmond, B.C. File photo by THE CANADIAN PRESS
While lumber prices drop, relief isn’t exactly on the way for consumers

Consumers in Alberta won’t see the benefit of falling lumber prices any… Continue reading

Red Deer South MLA Jason Stephan's decision to travel to Arizona for a holiday has been sharply criticized by many.
Advocate file photo
Jason Stephan: Quebec’s actions undermine interests of Alberta

Prior to serving as a MLA, I structured many commercial partnership agreements.… Continue reading

FILE - Great Britain’s Andrew Matthews, from left to right, Ben Simons, Toby Olubi and Lamin Deen celebrate after their second-place finish in a four-man World Cup Bobsleigh race in Whistler, British Columbia, in this Saturday, Nov. 25, 2017, file photo. British Bobsleigh and Skeleton announced Thursday, June 17, 2021, that the four-man team of Deen, Simons, Olubi and Matthews has been upgraded to the gold medal for a race that occurred Nov. 25, 2017 in Whistler, Canada. The Russian crew that beat them that day has since been disqualified. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
Britain upgraded to World Cup bobsled gold from 2017 race

Driver of Russian sled was sanctioned for doping violations

Leylah Annie Fernandez, of Canada, returns a shot Marie Bouzkova, of the Czech Republic, in round 1 of the Rogers Cup women’s tennis tournament in Toronto, Monday August 5, 2019. Leylah Annie Fernandez lost 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (3) to No. 2 seed Ons Jabeur of Tunisia in the second round of the Viking Classic Birmingham on Thursday. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch
Canadian Leylah Annie Fernandez loses third-set tiebreaker against Ons Jabeur

Jabeur now heads to the quarterfinals at the WTA Tour 250 grass-court event

Feist performs during the Polaris Music Prize gala in Toronto on September 18, 2017. Canadian singer-songwriter Leslie Feist is hitting the road with what’s described as an intimate and “unconventional production” featuring all new music.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Donovan
Leslie Feist to debut new music in ‘unconventional’ and intimate ‘Multitudes’ show

Calgary-raised artist will debut show at Kampnagel Festival in Germany

Letter: Improvements coming to two intersections in Red Deer to help cyclists

A letter in the Advocate on June 9 with complaints about cyclists… Continue reading

Opinion
Opinion: Trudeau tight-lipped on Constitution attack

When exactly did Canada become a Constitution-bashing country? For nearly 30 years,… Continue reading

Gwynne DYer
Opinion: Western countries giving out vaccines to poor nations

At the recent G7 summit, U.S. President Joe Biden promised to distribute… Continue reading

Most Read