Canada stays perfect at World Juniors

Canada 3 USA 2 EDMONTON — Canada’s junior hockey team saluted the crowd and passed autographed sticks over the glass as Edmonton’s Rexall Place chanted, “We want gold.”

Canada's goalie Scott Wedgewood flies over USA's Emerson Etem during second period IIHF World Junior Championships hockey action in Edmonton

Canada's goalie Scott Wedgewood flies over USA's Emerson Etem during second period IIHF World Junior Championships hockey action in Edmonton

Canada 3 USA 2

EDMONTON — Canada’s junior hockey team saluted the crowd and passed autographed sticks over the glass as Edmonton’s Rexall Place chanted, “We want gold.”

Canada capped a perfect run in the preliminary round of the world junior hockey championship with a 3-2 win over the United States on Saturday night.

The team now heads south to Calgary to play in Tuesday’s semifinal, where they will face either Russia or the Czech Republic.

Mark Stone led the host country with a goal and an assist. Jaden Schwartz and Brett Connolly also scored for Canada in front of 16,647.

Scott Wedgewood made 30 saves for his second win of the tournament.

The Canadian players signed white souvenir sticks before the game, saluted the crowd with them and then handed them to outstretched hands. For defenceman Mark Pysyk, a Sherwood Park native and the only Alberta-born player on the Canadian team, it was an emotional moment.

“I think the last time I saw this building like this was the Stanley Cup run for the Oilers,” Pysyk said of the 2006 NHL championship. “It’s a lot different being a part of it. It’s unbelievable out there. You just get the chills.”

Charlie Coyle and captain Jason Zucker replied for the U.S. in the third period. Goaltender Jack Campbell, playing in his third straight world junior tournament, made 32 saves.

Canada (4-0) had already secured first in Pool B and a bye to the semifinals heading into the game, while the U.S. (1-3) already knew it was headed for relegation round.

So what had been billed as the New Year’s Eve showdown lacked urgency. Bursts of spirited play and flashes of ill-will between the North American rivals were mixed with lulls and stretches that looked like shinny.

The Canadians were faster out of the gates than the Americans, building a 3-0 lead after the first period. The U.S. picked up the pace after that.

Two American goals within a four-minute span starting at 9:49 of the third period put pressure on Canada to preserve the win. After the second goal, Canadian head coach Don Hay called a timeout to settle his players down.

“We knew the U.S. had played yesterday and we wanted to get off to a great start with the fans behind us and we were able to do that,” Hay said. “The U.S. showed their character and really battled back. The game will make us a better team.

“Whenever you have to deal with a little bit of adversity and a little bit of pressure, it’s good for you. You really see some things from your players when the game gets on the line and how they think the game.”

Canada outscored its opposition 26-5 in the preliminary round. They depart for Calgary on Sunday morning and have two days off before the semifinal.

Finland (3-1) secured second place in Pool B with a 4-0 win Saturday over the Czechs (2-2), who finished third.

As Pool B wrapped up in Edmonton, Sweden (4-0) beat Russia 4-3 in overtime to win Pool A in Calgary and earn a bye into the semifinals. Russia (3-1) meanwhile will meet the Czechs in Monday’s quarter-final, with the winner facing Canada.

Slovakia secured third in the pool and a quarter-final berth with a 6-4 win over the Swiss earlier. They’ll face the Finns in the other quarter-final. The U.S., Denmark, Switzerland and Latvia fall to the relegation round.

After playing four games in six days, the pace slows down for Canada with two over the next five. Depending on their semifinal result, they’ll play for either gold or bronze Thursday in Calgary.

The Canadians looked ready to cruise to another win in Edmonton, outshooting the U.S. 19-8 in the first period.

But the U.S. came to life in the second period and provided some fireworks. American forward Emerson Etem and Wedgewood got in a footrace for a loose puck in the zone. After Wedgewood cleared the puck, the Medicine Hat Tiger submarined him.

Wedgewood sprawled on the ice and was slow to get up, but returned to the net.

“He lay down to try and block that pass and give himself an opportunity and I couldn’t jump high enough in time,” Wedgewood said. “I was a little shook up, but no worse for wear.”

Canadian defenceman Scott Harrington left the ice in the first half of the game and did not return. Hay said it was an ”upper-body“ injury, but didn’t expect it to keep Harrington out of the semifinal.

“I’m sure he’ll be ready to play,” Hay said.

Also, defenceman Nathan Beaulieu’s cheek was swollen like a chipmunk’s after taking a Stephen Johns shot off the face in the third period.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

If you're heading out to the West Country have a plan in case things go wrong, says Clearwater Regional Fire Rescue Services fire chief Steve Debienne.
(Photo from CRFRS Facebook)
West Country visitors should have an emergency plan: regional fire chief

Cellphones can’t be relied on in many back country areas

The Red Deer PCN Women's Fun Run will take on a different look this weekend with rising COVID-19 numbers.
Women’s Fun Run goes ahead this weekend

With new public health measures in place because of rising COVID-19 case… Continue reading

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw asked Albertans to limit travel throughout the province as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Red Deer nears 900 active COVID-19 cases

Province reports additional 2,211 COVID-19 cases

David Eggen, the NDP’s advanced education critic, said the UCP government has been focused on cutting funding to post-secondary institutions across Alberta. (Contributed photo)
NDP worry new status for Red Deer College doesn’t mean more funding

This week the province announced that RDC will become a polytechnic institute

Stock photo
Report: Canada loves hockey, but sport has its issues

While hockey is strongly intertwined in Canada’s lexicon as a country, some… Continue reading

Alberta Health Services locked the Whistle Stop Cafe in Mirror on Wednesday morning after owner Christopher Scott refused to comply with health orders. (Photo by Paul Cowley/Advocate staff)
UPDATED: AHS shuts down Whistle Stop Cafe for defying health orders

Justice minister promises to get tough with those ignoring public health orders

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to speakers appearing by video during a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday May 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada agrees to take part in WTO talks to waive patent protections on vaccines

Canada agrees to take part in WTO talks to waive patent protections on vaccines

Home renovation savings prove elusive as wood prices at record highs

Home renovation savings prove elusive as wood prices at record highs

Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. logo is shown at the company's annual meeting in Calgary on May 3, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Canadian Natural reports $1.38B Q1 profit, plans to use cash flow to reduce debt

Canadian Natural reports $1.38B Q1 profit, plans to use cash flow to reduce debt

Logs are piled up at West Fraser Timber in Quesnel, B.C., Tuesday, April 21, 2009. West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd. is reporting higher first-quarter sales and earnings after completing its $4-billion all-stock takeover of Norbord Inc. on Feb. 1. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
West Fraser reports US$665M in earnings, $2.3 billion in sales as it acquires Norbord

West Fraser reports US$665M in earnings, $2.3 billion in sales as it acquires Norbord

An oil worker holds raw sand bitumen near Fort McMurray, Alta., on July 9, 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta eases security payment burden for oilsands companies

Alberta eases security payment burden for oilsands companies

A street sign along Bay Street in Toronto's financial district is shown on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
S&P/TSX composite falls despite commodities, loonie hits highest level since 2017

S&P/TSX composite falls despite commodities, loonie hits highest level since 2017

Nicholas Marcus Thompson is shown in Toronto on Thursday April 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Action needed to end anti-Black racism in public service: advocates

OTTAWA — The federal government must address anti-Black racism in the public… Continue reading

Victoria Police help BC conservation officers carry a cougar which was tranquilized in the backyard of an apartment building in the community of James Bay in Victoria, B.C., Monday, October 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Cougar believed to be responsible for B.C. attack killed: conservation service

AGASSIZ, B.C. — The British Columbia Conservation Officer Service says it believes… Continue reading

Most Read