Republican presidential candidates former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney

Candidates debate business credentials

The two leading Republican presidential contenders tried to turn the arguments over their business dealings to their own advantage Tuesday, as Mitt Romney released tax documents that put him among the very richest Americans and Newt Gingrich defended his high-paid consulting work for a mortgage giant that contributed to the housing crisis.

TAMPA, Fla. — The two leading Republican presidential contenders tried to turn the arguments over their business dealings to their own advantage Tuesday, as Mitt Romney released tax documents that put him among the very richest Americans and Newt Gingrich defended his high-paid consulting work for a mortgage giant that contributed to the housing crisis.

The country’s struggling economy remains voters’ top concern as Republicans choose a candidate to run against President Barack Obama, who was delivering his State of the Union policy address Tuesday night to a joint session of Congress.

In excerpts of his speech released in advance, Obama attacked income inequality and advocated an economy where “everyone gets a fair shot.” He accuses Republicans of defending the interests of the wealthy at the expense of everyone else.

The president’s timing could not have been better for a message about income inequality. Romney’s tax returns revealed that he earned nearly $22 million in 2010 and paid an effective tax rate of about 14 per cent. That is a lesser rate than many Americans pay because of how investment income is taxed in the United States.

Romney’s income put him in the top 0.006 per cent of Americans, according to Internal Revenue Service data from 2009, the most recent year available. His net worth has been estimated as high as $250 million.

It remains unclear how the details of Romney’s wealth will play among American workers, who on average earn less in a lifetime than Romney paid in taxes in 2010 alone.

After a night of mutual sniping in a debate, Romney’s release of two years’ worth of tax documents, showing him at an elite level even among the nation’s richest 1 per cent, kept the focus on the two candidates’ money and how they earned it.

As Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, relented to political pressure and released more than 500 pages of details from his federal tax returns — including a now-closed Swiss bank account — Gingrich kept up the heat, saying Romney was “outrageously dishonest” for accusing him of influence peddling while doing consulting work for government-backed mortgage giant Freddie Mac..

“I don’t own any Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac stock. He does, so presumably he was getting richer,” the former House speaker told Fox News on Tuesday.

Freddie Mac and its larger sister institution Fannie Mae, have become targets for criticism — especially from Republicans — stemming from the housing crisis that helped drive the United States deep into recession and then hampered recovery. Romney’s tax filings show he was an investor in Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.

Gingrich, who has come under fire for earning more than $1.6 million working as a consultant to Freddie Mac, insisted his high-paid work for the mortgage giant did not include lobbying.

The two candidates squared off a week before the Florida primary on Jan. 31. The state’s diversity, large population and large media markets are a bigger challenge than the three smaller states that have voted in the nominating process so far.

Surveys of Florida Republicans show Gingrich leading Romney after his decisive win in the South Carolina primary over the weekend, making Florida pivotal if Romney is to reassert his former role as the inevitable Republican nominee.

The spectre of well-off Gingrich and wealthier Romney feuding over money matters pleased former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, who lags in polls ahead of Florida’s primary but hopes to benefit from the dust-up between the front-runners as the race moves on. He told MSNBC: “The other two candidates have some severe flaws.”

On Tuesday, Romney stood outside a Fannie Mae-foreclosed home in a struggling neighbourhood in Lehigh Acres to assail Gingrich over his ties to the government-backed mortgage companies that helped make the housing crisis work, particularly in states like Florida which has one of the highest foreclosure rates in the U.S.

In Florida, Romney argued that regulations passed during the Obama administration give banks less flexibility if they’re trying to help consumers renegotiate the terms of their mortgages. Romney himself hasn’t outlined any specific proposals to help fix the housing market. He says improving the economy will allow Americans to regain their footing and keep their homes.

Gingrich, a candidate once left for dead, stood before thousands in a U.S. flag-draped airport hangar in Sarasota brimming with confidence about his chances of winning the Republican nomination. He barely mentioned Romney in two events, though he went hard at Obama.

Gingrich said Obama should stop blaming his Republican predecessor for the country’s economic woes.

“This is the fourth year of his presidency. He needs to get over it,” Gingrich said. “A friend of mine says, ‘He has shifted from Yes We Can to Why We Couldn’t.”’

Gingrich’s campaign also announced it had pulled in $2 million, mostly online, since winning the South Carolina primary on Saturday. Gingrich planned to pad his campaign account with a series of fundraisers this week.

Records released by Romney’s campaign show he closed a bank account in Switzerland in 2010, as he was entering the presidential race. He also kept money in the Cayman Islands, another spot popular with investors sheltering their income from U.S. taxes. But Benjamin Ginsberg, the Romney campaign’s legal counsel, said Romney didn’t use any aggressive tax strategies to help reduce or defer his tax income.

“Gov. Romney has paid 100 per cent of what he owes,” Ginsberg said Tuesday.

Romney paid about $3 million on nearly $22 million in income in 2010 and indicated his 2011 taxes would be about the same, $3.2 million on nearly $21 million in income.

During the Monday night debate, Romney predicted his tax information would generate chatter but not any surprises, saying what he paid was “entirely legal and fair.”

In 2010, he donated a combined $3 million to the Mormon Church and other charitable causes. His effective tax rate was about 14 per cent, the records showed.

For 2011, he’ll pay an effective tax rate of about 15.4 per cent, a level far lower than standard rates for high-income earners, reflecting the lower rate for long-term capital gains.

Just Posted

The Latest: UK leader congratulates royals on birth of son

LONDON — The Latest on the royal baby birth: 1:50 p.m. British… Continue reading

Key events in the life of William, Kate and their family

LONDON — The Duchess of Cambridge gave birth Monday to a baby… Continue reading

Broncos families surprised obituaries are on website selling services

Some families of Humboldt Broncos bus crash victims are surprised to learn… Continue reading

‘It’s limitless:’ Paralyzed toddler moves from homemade wheelchair to treadmill

EDMONTON — Evelyn Moore sings the alphabet song as her tiny running… Continue reading

Shania Twain apologizes for saying she would have voted for Donald Trump

Shania Twain is apologizing after telling a British newspaper that she would… Continue reading

Replay Red Deer April 22, 2018

Watch weekly news highlights from Red Deer and Central Alberta

Crosby, Penguins keep 3rd straight championship in sight

PHILADELPHIA — Sidney Crosby tormented the Flyers just as he has from… Continue reading

29-year-old chef dies after collapsing at London Marathon

London Marathon organizers say a 29-year-old man died after collapsing near the… Continue reading

Greece beats budget target as it looks to post-bailout era

ATHENS, Greece — Greece has beaten its budget targets for a third… Continue reading

Etiquette and protocol highlights for royal wedding guests

NEW YORK — Grab those nude stockings, ladies. You’ll be at a… Continue reading

Federal environment minister defends BP Canada’s plans to drill in N.S.

HALIFAX — Federal Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna is defending… Continue reading

Facebook’s privacy changes look different for Europeans and Americans

All 2.2 billion people who use Facebook will soon see changes to… Continue reading

Vermont wants to turn tourists into workers

Vermont has forest trails, yoga retreats, breweries galore – and a labor… Continue reading

Trump leading on North Korea, says envoy to Canada as G7 ministers meet

TORONTO — Donald Trump’s envoy to Canada says her president is leading… Continue reading

Most Read


Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $185 for 260 issues (must live in delivery area to qualify) Unlimited Digital Access 99 cents for the first four weeks and then only $15 per month Five-day delivery plus unlimited digital access for $15 a month