Captain America: The Winter Soldier sets April record

Disney and Marvel could be one of the finest teams around. Continuing the success of their superhero franchise, Captain America: The Winter Soldier has set a record as the biggest domestic April release ever. The Disney sequel debuted with $96.2 million topping the previous record holder, 2011’s Fast Five, which opened with $86.2 million.

LOS ANGELES — Disney and Marvel could be one of the finest teams around.

Continuing the success of their superhero franchise, Captain America: The Winter Soldier has set a record as the biggest domestic April release ever.

The Disney sequel debuted with $96.2 million topping the previous record holder, 2011’s Fast Five, which opened with $86.2 million.

Last weekend The Winter Soldier, which stars Chris Evans as the shield-wielding superhero, and Scarlett Johansson (whose sci-fi Under the Skin also debuted this weekend with $140,000) as Black Widow, commanded 32 international markets, gaining $75.2 million in its overseas bow.

Expanding to Russia, Australia and China in its second week, the Marvel comic adaptation, boasting a budget of over $170 million, has earned $207.1 million internationally, bringing its overall worldwide haul to over $303 million.

Also a touchstone for Imax, The Winter Soldier attained $9.6 million on 346 screens showing the film in the enhanced resolution format.

Internationally the film showed on 278 Imax screens resulting in a $6.5 million gain, $4 million of which was delivered from China.

Captain America: The First Avenger, which had a budget of around $140 million, debuted in 2011 with $65 million when it opened in July. Overall it earned $371 million worldwide.

Why the shift to an April release rather than remaining a summer launch?

“We looked at the possibility of creating separation from the other summer tentpoles,” said Dave Hollis, head of worldwide theatrical distribution for Disney.

“There was an opportunity. We have the second Marvel film coming at the end of the summer in Guardians of the Galaxy. We wanted to start and end the summer and take advantage of this holiday. In the next month or so we’ll have the benefit of spring break.”

“The Avengers effect,” as Hollis calls it, set the stage for the continuation of Marvel’s massive box office presence, which has continued with the Iron Man and Thor franchises. With the release of the films’ sequels, both have seen jumps of earnings over 35 per cent.

“There are very few movie brands that are this consistent,” said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for box-office tracker Rentrak of the Disney-Marvel team.

“For The Winter Solider to push on $100 million in April shows that you can release a big movie any time of the year. Every studio is going to be looking at this date to plant their flag in the future.”

Paramount’s biblical saga Noah, starring Russell Crowe, Jennifer Connelly and Emma Watson, took a drastic dip in its second weekend, earning $17 million after debuting with $44 million.

Still, it sailed into second place, crossing the $70 million mark domestically, while pushing Lionsgate’s young adult science-fiction thriller Divergent, led by Shailene Woodley, to third with $13 million in its third week. Its stateside take is now $114 million.

Freestyle Releasing’s surprise hit God’s Not Dead took the No. 4 slot with $7.7 million in its third weekend. Despite the decrease in the Noah box office performance, the outcome of film’s debut, its overall haul, and the success of both Son of God and God’s Not Dead bodes well for other biblical-themed films coming this year, including Heaven is for Real, starring Greg Kinnear and Exodus: Gods and Kings, starring Christian Bale.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theatres, according to Rentrak. Where available, latest international numbers are also included. Final domestic figures will be released today.

1.Captain America: The Winter Soldier, $96.2 million.

2. Noah, $17 million.

3. Divergent, $13 million.

4. God’s Not Dead, $7.7 million.

5. The Grand Budapest Hotel, $6.3 million.

6. Muppets Most Wanted, $6.3 million.

7. Mr. Peabody and Sherman, $5.3 million.

8. Sabotage, $1.9 million.

9. Need for Speed, $1.84 million.

10. Non-Stop, $1.83 million.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

If you're heading out to the West Country have a plan in case things go wrong, says Clearwater Regional Fire Rescue Services fire chief Steve Debienne.
(Photo from CRFRS Facebook)
West Country visitors should have an emergency plan: regional fire chief

Cellphones can’t be relied on in many back country areas

The Red Deer PCN Women's Fun Run will take on a different look this weekend with rising COVID-19 numbers.
Women’s Fun Run goes ahead this weekend

With new public health measures in place because of rising COVID-19 case… Continue reading

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw asked Albertans to limit travel throughout the province as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. (Photo by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Red Deer nears 900 active COVID-19 cases

Province reports additional 2,211 COVID-19 cases

David Eggen, the NDP’s advanced education critic, said the UCP government has been focused on cutting funding to post-secondary institutions across Alberta. (Contributed photo)
NDP worry new status for Red Deer College doesn’t mean more funding

This week the province announced that RDC will become a polytechnic institute

Stock photo
Report: Canada loves hockey, but sport has its issues

While hockey is strongly intertwined in Canada’s lexicon as a country, some… Continue reading

Alberta Health Services locked the Whistle Stop Cafe in Mirror on Wednesday morning after owner Christopher Scott refused to comply with health orders. (Photo by Paul Cowley/Advocate staff)
UPDATED: AHS shuts down Whistle Stop Cafe for defying health orders

Justice minister promises to get tough with those ignoring public health orders

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to speakers appearing by video during a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday May 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada agrees to take part in WTO talks to waive patent protections on vaccines

Canada agrees to take part in WTO talks to waive patent protections on vaccines

Home renovation savings prove elusive as wood prices at record highs

Home renovation savings prove elusive as wood prices at record highs

Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. logo is shown at the company's annual meeting in Calgary on May 3, 2012. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Canadian Natural reports $1.38B Q1 profit, plans to use cash flow to reduce debt

Canadian Natural reports $1.38B Q1 profit, plans to use cash flow to reduce debt

Logs are piled up at West Fraser Timber in Quesnel, B.C., Tuesday, April 21, 2009. West Fraser Timber Co. Ltd. is reporting higher first-quarter sales and earnings after completing its $4-billion all-stock takeover of Norbord Inc. on Feb. 1. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
West Fraser reports US$665M in earnings, $2.3 billion in sales as it acquires Norbord

West Fraser reports US$665M in earnings, $2.3 billion in sales as it acquires Norbord

An oil worker holds raw sand bitumen near Fort McMurray, Alta., on July 9, 2008. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta eases security payment burden for oilsands companies

Alberta eases security payment burden for oilsands companies

A street sign along Bay Street in Toronto's financial district is shown on Tuesday, January 12, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
S&P/TSX composite falls despite commodities, loonie hits highest level since 2017

S&P/TSX composite falls despite commodities, loonie hits highest level since 2017

Nicholas Marcus Thompson is shown in Toronto on Thursday April 29, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Action needed to end anti-Black racism in public service: advocates

OTTAWA — The federal government must address anti-Black racism in the public… Continue reading

Victoria Police help BC conservation officers carry a cougar which was tranquilized in the backyard of an apartment building in the community of James Bay in Victoria, B.C., Monday, October 5, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Cougar believed to be responsible for B.C. attack killed: conservation service

AGASSIZ, B.C. — The British Columbia Conservation Officer Service says it believes… Continue reading

Most Read