Coastal First Nations walk out of pipeline review

PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. — Coastal First Nations have left the federal review of the Northern Gateway pipeline plan, saying they’ve run out of money and patience.

PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. — Coastal First Nations have left the federal review of the Northern Gateway pipeline plan, saying they’ve run out of money and patience.

Executive director Art Sterritt has told the panel the group representing nine aboriginal bands from the B.C. coast and Haida Gwaii has spent more than three times the amount of funding allotted by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency four years ago.

Sterritt said the approximately $280,000 they had cannot compare to the $250 million that Enbridge (TSX:ENB) is spending on the regulatory review process.

“We simply have not been provided with the funding necessary to engage in this process meaningfully or effectively,” Sterritt told the panel as hearings resumed in Prince Rupert on Monday.

“This is extremely distressing and disappointing to us, as we have a great deal at stake in these proceedings and in particular this panel.”

Sterritt, whose group is opposed to the pipeline that would deliver crude from the Alberta oil sands to a tanker port in Kitimat, left open the possibility of returning to the joint review process in the future.

But there is a funding disparity between those who oppose the project and the deep pockets of Enbridge, he said.

“It seems the only party that can afford this long and extended hearing process is Enbridge itself, and perhaps the Crown. The average citizen can’t afford to be here, and certainly the Coastal First Nations can’t afford it,” Sterritt said.

The group had been scheduled for seven hours to question the Enbridge expert panel giving evidence under oath this week on marine spills and spill response.

The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency provided funds for interveners to take part in the review process. Coastal First Nations requested $520,000 for expenses including studies, lawyers and attendance at the hearings since 2009. The board allotted the group $286,000, including $25,000 for legal costs.

By comparison, Sterritt said Northern Gateway has a “battery of lawyers which likely spends more in a day than we have for the whole process.”

His group asked for additional money but found out last month the request had been denied.

Enbridge itself provided nearly $13 million to aboriginal groups to take part in the process.

Coastal First Nations confirmed a year ago to The Canadian Press that the group had received $100,000. Individual member bands, including the Wuikinuxv Nation, Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xaixais, Nuxalk Nation, Gitga’at, Metlakatla, Old Massett, Skidegate, and Council of the Haida Nation, may also have received funds individually.

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