Cultural passes for new citizens

People who become Canadian citizens have the chance to use a free cultural pass to more than 160 museums, art galleries, historic sites, discovery centres and parks across Canada.

People who become Canadian citizens have the chance to use a free cultural pass to more than 160 museums, art galleries, historic sites, discovery centres and parks across Canada.

The free Cultural Access Pass program helps new citizens create their own Canadian experiences in their first year of citizenship by opening doors to Canadian culture.

The Alberta government has partnered with the Institute for Canadian Citizenship that allows pass holders visiting Alberta’s nearly 500 provincial parks.

Participants can enjoy free day-use privileges to all of Alberta’s provincial parks including daily ski passes to Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park. They also have free access to select parks programs throughout Alberta, including bus tours at Dinosaur Provincial Park.

The pass also includes free camping for two nights at a basic campsite and free backcountry camping for two nights.

“We want to encourage all Albertans to enjoy provincial parks regardless of how long they’ve lived here,” said Tourism, Parks and Recreation Minister Cindy Ady.

New Canadians can register for the Cultural Access Pass through www.culturalaccesspass.ca or by calling 1-888-359-6998.

The Institute for Canadian Citizenship is a national, nonprofit organization engaging Canadians in citizenship through innovative programs, campaigns and partnerships designed to ensure new citizens are welcomed and included as equals, to create meaningful connections among all Canadian citizens and to foster a culture of active, engaged citizens.

In addition to the new partnership, the Alberta government has developed Nature as a Second Language multilingual guide books to encourage new Canadians to visit provincial parks, and includes information ranging from campfire safety tips to checklists on what to bring when you go camping.

The guidebooks are on hand in various languages and can be found at various Park Visitor Information Centres and online at www.albertaparks.ca/naturelanguage.