Exhibit tackles men’s suicide

The impact of men’s suicide upon family and friends has been translated into images as part of the University of British Columbia’s photo exhibition Man-Up Against Suicide that will be in Rimbey from today to Monday.

The impact of men’s suicide upon family and friends has been translated into images as part of the University of British Columbia’s photo exhibition Man-Up Against Suicide that will be in Rimbey from Thursday to Monday.

By coincidence, 11 out of the 61 participants who contributed photos to convey how they felt were from Rimbey.

Genevieve Creighton, part of the exhibition team, said photos were therapeutic for some participants as it allowed them externalize their emotions or memories of those who died. Other photos represented ways to prevent suicide.

Creighton said one woman from Rimbey took a photo of a field with a couple of pickup trucks in the distance.

“She said it represented why men’s suicide is higher in rural areas. They go into the industry at a real young age and it kind of teaches them about being tough … and that’s where they learn they can’t talk about things that are bothering them or talk about sadness, or if they are struggling around issues of sexual orientation. They have to be silent about that just because the industry is so masculine,” said Creighton about the photo.

The photo is one of about 25 that will be on display in Rimbey at Beatty Heritage House, at 5002 51st St.

A description of the photo from the participant is superimposed over their photo.

The opening reception for Man-Up Against Suicide will be held today from 5 to 8 p.m. with snacks and refreshments. A panel of speakers will discuss how to reduce the pressures that keep men silent when it comes to depression and suicide.

Man-Up Against Suicide will run until Monday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Dr. John Ogrodniczuk, professor and director of the psychotherapy program at UBC’s Department of Psychiatry, said the exhibition is all about encouraging people to talk about men’s suicide so men are more likely to open up about their problems and prevent suicides.

He recalled how a report on survivors who jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco showed the importance of that discussion.

“Every single one said the moment they leapt, they regretted the act. They didn’t want to die. So that’s a big thing that people need to think about. When we start talking about it, when the media picks it up, it’s not like trying to push people over the edge — it’s like you’re trying to pull people back. In a way, it’s a bit of a lifeline,” said Ogrodniczuk, who grew up in Rimbey.

According to statistics collected by Man-Up Against Suicide, the risk for suicide among men in rural areas increases by 40 per cent or more the further away they were from urban centres. For a community like Rimbey, the suicide mortality rate was 27.3 per 100,000 compared to 19.3 in urban areas.

Suicide is the leading cause of death among men age 25 to 29 and 40 to 44.

Suicide triggers include feelings of sadness associated with loss or grief, financial hardship, relationship issues, loss of a job or social status, worrying about death, lost purpose, work, retirement and depression.

For college-age men, triggers can be isolation from family and friends, financial strain, work and study pressures, poor career prospects, and stresses around body image and gender identity.

Men with depression or suicidal thoughts should disclose their feelings to their general practitioner, psychologist, counsellor, and/or psychiatrist.

Families and friends are encouraged to:

l Be active listeners for men disclosing their feelings.

l Provide simple social support through outings and physical activity at least until they are stabilized by accessing professional help.

l After building up rapport, suggest they access support services through their family doctor, counsellor, social worker, or other health care professional.

l If possible offer to accompany them to the initial mental health appointment and/or set up the appointment on their behalf.

l Report the severity of the depression, suicidal thoughts or self-harm behaviours to his doctor or therapist.

l Provide hope by reassuring him that he can overcome depression by following his health care team’s recommendations.

Man-Up Against Suicide, funded by Movember, first opened in Vancouver in June. For more information on the project, visit www.manupagainstsuicide.ca.

szielinski@bprda.wpengine.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

According to the city, trees are the main solution to improving urban canopy cover in downtown areas.
Tree care focus of free webinar

Red Deer and Lacombe Counties hosting March 11 webinar

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks during a news conference in Edmonton on Feb. 24, 2020. It’s budget day in the province, and Kenney’s United Conservative government is promising more help in the fight against COVID, but more red ink on the bottom line. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Alberta’s budget promises more help for COVID-19 with a hard deficit

EDMONTON — Alberta’s COVID-19-era budget made a hard landing Thursday with an… Continue reading

The expansion of the Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre has been discussed for over a decade. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Red Deer hospital expansion gets about $6 million in 2021 provincial budget

According to the government’s three-year plan, the project will get $59 million by 2024.

The Town of Sylvan Lake has launched a new contest to attract a new business. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Sylvan Lake offering rent-free storefront space to lure new businesses

Winning business proposal will get a storefront space rent-free for a year

An arrest by Red Deer RCMP is facing online scrutiny. No charges have been laid and the incident is still under investigation. (Screenshot of YouTube video)
Red Deer RCMP investigating violent arrest caught on video

Police say officer ‘acted within the scope of his duties’

Calgary Flames defenceman Mark Giordano tries to help goaltender David Rittich stop a shot from Ottawa Senators right wing Drake Batherson during first-period NHL action Thursday, February 25, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Colin White scores two goals to lead Ottawa Senators to a 6-1 win over Calgary Flames

Colin White scores two goals to lead Ottawa Senators to a 6-1 win over Calgary Flames

Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy Vice-Admiral Art McDonald is seen during an interview with The Canadian Press in Ottawa, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Military reeling as new defence chief steps aside amid allegations of misconduct

Military reeling as new defence chief steps aside amid allegations of misconduct

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks during a news conference in Edmonton on Feb. 24, 2020. It’s budget day in the province, and Kenney’s United Conservative government is promising more help in the fight against COVID, but more red ink on the bottom line. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Alberta’s budget promises more help for COVID-19 with a hard deficit

Alberta’s budget promises more help for COVID-19 with a hard deficit

‘Black box’ in Woods SUV could yield clues to cause of wreck

‘Black box’ in Woods SUV could yield clues to cause of wreck

Team Saskatchewan skip Sherry Anderson reacts to her shot against Team Quebec at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Peterson’s wild-card team edges N.W.T. skip Galusha to qualify for championship pool

Peterson’s wild-card team edges N.W.T. skip Galusha to qualify for championship pool

No-size-fits-all residence approach a reality for Canadian Hockey League teams

No-size-fits-all residence approach a reality for Canadian Hockey League teams

FILE - New York Rangers' Henrik Lundqvist reacts after a save during the third period of an NHL hockey game against the Philadelphia Flyers in New York, in this Sunday, March 1, 2020, file photo. The Flyers defeated the Rangers 5-3. Star goalie Henrik Lundqvist will sit out the upcoming NHL season because of a heart condition, announcing the news a little more than two months after joining the Washington Capitals. Lundqvist posted a written statement and a videotaped one on social media Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020, saying it was a "pretty tough and emotional day." The 38-year-old from Sweden was bought out by the New York Rangers after 15 seasons and signed a $1.5 million, one-year deal with Washington in October. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
Lundqvist back on ice, ‘months’ away from deciding future

Lundqvist back on ice, ‘months’ away from deciding future

Kiiwetinoong MPP Sol Mamakwa holds up water collected from Neskantaga First Nation, where residents were evacuated over tainted water in October, during a rally at Queen's Park in Toronto on Friday, Nov. 6, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio
Feds didn’t supply enough resources to end water advisories on First Nations: auditor

Feds didn’t supply enough resources to end water advisories on First Nations: auditor

Most Read