Flood cleanup a municipal burden

I do not understand why Albertans are facing multibillion-dollar cleanup costs following June’s flooding. It is the cities and towns that bet the money from building permits, etc., against paying for damages to said property or structures. As long as the provincial government pays the damages, no city or town has to accept responsibility for their decisions.

I do not understand why Albertans are facing multibillion-dollar cleanup costs following June’s flooding.

It is the cities and towns that bet the money from building permits, etc., against paying for damages to said property or structures. As long as the provincial government pays the damages, no city or town has to accept responsibility for their decisions.

Until Red Deerians refuse to pay for Calgary’s foibles, things will never change.

In 1973 when Calgary flooded, there was very little property damage. The flood map of 1973 is almost a duplicate of a 2013 flood map of the Bow and Elbow Rivers. But the property damage is huge.

Why?

How did Albertans benefit by having properties in the flood zone?

In 1996, the hundred-year flood washed out the bridge on the Sheep River in Turner Valley. It also washed out the bridge on the Highwood River on Hwy 541, so one assumes High River was flooded.

In 2005, Turner Valley/High River received seven to eight inches of rain in four days, along with snow melt. The sun came out for four days and Albertans go to replace carpets, etc., in flooded High River houses under the former premier.

After four days of sunshine, the rain started again, and 10 inches fell in five days. Guess what? Albertans got to buy carpets, etc., again for the same houses in High River.

Why do I feel that we are doing it again in 2013?

Ed A. Powell

Red Deer