GM meetings focus on goalie equipment, visors

TORONTO — NHL GMs discussed reducing the size of goalie equipment and increasing video review Wednesday, while both the league and NHL Players’ Association sounded a desire to grandfather in mandatory visors. “Every little piece of goaltender equipment is now a project for a goalie to get bigger,” said Colin Campbell, the NHL’s vice-president of hockey operations.

TORONTO — NHL GMs discussed reducing the size of goalie equipment and increasing video review Wednesday, while both the league and NHL Players’ Association sounded a desire to grandfather in mandatory visors.

“Every little piece of goaltender equipment is now a project for a goalie to get bigger,” said Colin Campbell, the NHL’s vice-president of hockey operations.

Campbell said the instructions to Kay Whitmore, the NHL’s goalie guru, are “Do what you have to do within reason to make sure they’re still protected to reduce the stopping area.”

Current rules allows goalie pads to go 55 per cent of the way between your knee and your pelvis, says Whitmore.

“The feeling of the managers today was that that seems to be a little bit too generous and if we can find maybe a number that is a little lower that provides adequate protection then we’re willing to take a look at that,” said Whitmore. Mathieu Schneider, a special assistant to NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr, said players should rely on their own talents rather than equipment.

“The other concern is that you see a lot of pucks going high now. Defencemen especially shoot high from the point and that creates another danger obviously — that was something with the (Rangers defenceman Marc) Staal injury we saw. An awful lot more pucks are going high because you just can’t score on the ice any more.”

Toronto goalie James Reimer was not that taken by the concept of such change.

“Obviously as goalies, we don’t want to give up any of our size or any of our gear — for safety reasons and puck-stopping reasons,” he said after helping the Leafs beat Tampa Bay 4-2. “We’re comfortable with it. I don’t think any forwards would like it if you talked of taking away their one-piece sticks.”

Both sides seemed in favour of visors. Schneider said 72-73 per cent of NHL players currently wear shields.

“By the sheer numbers of players wearing them, you’re seeing a big change in visors,” said Schneider.“I’m certainly an advocate — and a bit of a hypocrite myself because I played my entire career without one. But the game’s extremely fast. Guys come into the league now having had to wear a visor before. We’re definitely going to look at talking to the guys about grandfathering them in.”

That might involve polling the players on the issue. The last time they did that, in 2009, players were “heavily” against grandfathering in visors, he said.

That might involve polling the players on the issue. The last time they did that, in 2009, players were “heavily” against grandfathering in visors, he said. Campbell said the GMs are in favour of grandfathering in visors, making them mandatory for players entering the league.

“They’re not going to ask players who don’t have visors on now to wear visors,” he said.

On the issue of video review, Campbell said there was no move to a so-called coach’s challenge. But he said GMs raised many instances of possible review including goaltender interference and offside.

There was positive talk of reviewing four-minute high-sticking penalties, to see if a player had been hit by his own teammate’s stick.

Campbell said goaltender interference challenges would be hard, but he was in favour of offside reviews to prevent erroneous, embarrassing calls.

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