Lacombe 2012 capital works program approved

Lacombe City Council approved the capital works program for 2012 despite costs that came in $750,000 over budget.

Lacombe City Council approved the capital works program for 2012 despite costs that came in $750,000 over budget.

Lacombe engineering services manager Matthew Goudy said a majority of the projects slated under the program were related to the flooding last summer.

The city budgeted $5.26 million for the program but the lowest bid to come back from tender was for just over $5.6 million. When engineering is included the program’s final tally will be closer to $6.1 million.

The bulk of the work consists of storm water collection and conveyance infrastructure that was recommended by Stantec Consulting in response to the flooding.

Other projects include three blocks of water and sanitary mains that have caused problems for over three years.

Goudy said the city has also partnered with private residents to jointly fund upgrades to address ongoing sewer blockage problems that have developed because of tree root intrusion.

The remaining scope of work is mostly paving roads that will see significant degradation if put off, added Goudy.

“Many of the projects came in higher because the contracting market for underground work is very busy right now,” said Goudy.

“Paving came back under budget but the underground work came in quite a bit over budget.”

He recommended the removal of the Woodland Drive Roadway Extension from the program which would save approximately $138,000.

Goudy added the work can be combined with other upgrades that will take place there in 2013.

Delaying any of the other projects wouldn’t save any money just delay the spending until next year, said Goudy.

Councillors would have liked to see more projects cut out to see the costs reduced closer to the budget but Goudy said majority of the projects would be cheaper to do this year.

Councillors voted unanimously to go ahead with the 2012 capital program minus the Woodland Drive Roadway Extension at an estimated cost of $5.479 million with the excess costs coming from a combination of reserves and available grant funding.