Miami Heat add three-point threats Allen and Lewis

MIAMI — Ray Allen’s role in Miami is yet to be totally determined. And that clearly doesn’t bother the NBA’s leading 3-point shooter.

MIAMI — Ray Allen’s role in Miami is yet to be totally determined. And that clearly doesn’t bother the NBA’s leading 3-point shooter.

Allen and Rashard Lewis signed their free-agent contracts with the Heat on Wednesday, giving the NBA champions a pair of veterans who bring tons of experience and versatility to a lineup already featuring LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh.

And both wasted no time saying they want to adapt to the Heat way.

“Whatever’s going to be best for me in this situation is going to figure itself out,” Allen said, flanked by Heat President Pat Riley and coach Erik Spoelstra for his introductory news conference. “This team won a championship without me. I’m not going to come in and expect for coach to cater to who I am and what I do. I’ve got to make that work on the floor with my new teammates.”

Allen agreed to join the Heat on Friday, deciding to leave Boston after five wildly successful seasons and the 2008 NBA championship. Lewis agreed to terms with Miami on Tuesday.

Allen will make just over $3 million this season. Lewis will earn about $1.35 million from the Heat, plus another $13.7 million after getting a buyout from the New Orleans Hornets earlier this off-season.

“I’m at a point in my career where I’ve been on the All-Star team, played for 13, 14 years and I’ve made a pretty good amount of money over my career,” Lewis said. “Everybody sets goals over their career and my next goal is obviously to try to win a championship. The ball can’t bounce forever. I’m sure you all see the grey hair on my head.”

For Lewis, coming to Miami is a new beginning. For Allen, coming to Miami wraps up a month of unexpected twists and turns.

The Celtics’ season ended in Miami a little over a month ago, with a loss in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals. Allen was unusually emotional after that defeat, then insisted that even after an injury-marred season — he’s recovering from surgery to remove bone spurs from his right ankle — he has basketball left in his legs.

Boston tried to keep him, offering him twice as much as he’ll make per year in Miami. Nonetheless, Allen found himself drawn to the Heat.

“You come into the summer, and you don’t know what potentially can happen,” Allen said. “And you take the process a step at a time, try to figure out what’s best for you and your family. And here I sit.”

Allen said that Celtics coach Doc Rivers and general manager Danny Ainge were disappointed by his decision. Allen said he reached out to Kevin Garnett — he was particularly close with Garnett and Paul Pierce in Boston — when he began leaning toward Miami, telling Garnett in a text message that the move was likely.

Garnett’s responded by saying that he was sure Ainge would do whatever it took to keep Allen in Boston.

Days later, Allen was signing in Miami. And on Wednesday, Allen downplayed the notion that the move came in part because of a perceived rift with Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo.

“I can’t say that it factored in my decision,” Allen said. “As teammates, we were brothers. … There’s differences. We all have differences. Paul eats corn flakes. I might not like corn flakes. That’s just part of kind of who we are as individuals.”

Lewis has already thought plenty about what it could mean to share the court with James, Wade, Bosh and Allen. In short, he knows defences could be a bit confounded.

“You’ve got to double-team LeBron. You have to double-team Dwyane Wade. You’ve got to double-team Chris Bosh. And then you think they’re going to leave Ray Allen open?” Lewis said. “They’ve got to leave somebody open. So I have to go shoot a million jumpers tonight and be ready to knock them down.”

A few moments later, Lewis posed with Riley and Spoelstra, holding his new No. 9 jersey in Miami colours.

“He’s played in a great program already. He’s been to the finals. He’s a winner,” Spoelstra said. “We’ve had some great battles against him.”

Spoelstra simply raved about Allen as well.

“There’s only a handful of players, really, in this league that absolutely strike fear into their opponent. And Ray is one of those players,” Spoelstra said.

Allen and Lewis were Seattle teammates for five seasons, from 2003 through 2007 — and both figure to fit perfectly into Miami’s plan to surround James, Wade and Bosh with even more shooters who can stretch defences.

Allen’s 2,718 made 3-pointers are the most in NBA history, and Lewis ranks fifth among active players with 1,690 makes from beyond the arc.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

House sales remain hot in central Alberta with first-quarter sales nearly double last year's numbers.
Photo by PAUL COWLEY/Advocate staff
Central Alberta real estate hot in 2021

Residential sales nearly double 2020 in first quarter

Red Deer Mayor Tara Veer gave an update on Olymel's COVID-19 situation on Wednesday. (File photo by Advocate staff).
Veer addresses rising COVID-19 cases in Red Deer

Red Deer has added nearly 200 cases of active COVID-19 cases in past week

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw and Premier Jason Kenney say the province would look at adding additional COVID-19 measures in the coming weeks if the virus continues to spread. (Photo by Government of Alberta)
Walk-in COVID-19 vaccination clinic to open in Red Deer

Alberta adds 1,345 new cases of the virus

Innisfail RCMP are investigating a single-vehicle crash that happened west of Bowden on March 21, 2021. (File photo by Advocate staff)
RCMP investigate culturally insensitive graffiti at Sylvan Lake school

Sylvan Lake RCMP is investigating a vandalism incident. On April 17 around… Continue reading

A vial of the Medicago vaccine sits on a surface. CARe Clinic, located in Red Deer, has been selected to participate in the third phase of vaccine study. (Photo courtesy www.medicago.com)
Red Deer clinical research centre participating in plant-based COVID-19 vaccine trial

A Red Deer research centre has been selected to participate in the… Continue reading

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is joined virtually by Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland as they talk online to a group of front-line pharmacists from across the country to discuss the ongoing vaccination efforts in the fight against COVID‑19, from the Prime Ministers office on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, April 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Freeland says Liberals open to provincial child care demands, draws line around fees

Freeland says Liberals open to provincial child care demands, draws line around fees

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist, an independent pharmacy in Toronto, Monday, April 19, 2021. Younger Canadians in several provinces are now able to get the AstraZeneca vaccine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Trudeau, Freeland seeking AstraZeneca shots as they become age-eligible with others

Trudeau, Freeland seeking AstraZeneca shots as they become age-eligible with others

Lit candles and photographs are seen on display at a vigil for Calgary homicide victims Sara Baillie and her five-year-old daughter, Taliyah Marsman, in Calgary, on July 17, 2016. Alberta's top court has rejected an appeal from the man convicted of killing Baillie and Taliyah, who was asking for a new trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Court of Appeal denies new trial for man in murders of woman, her daughter

Alberta Court of Appeal denies new trial for man in murders of woman, her daughter

Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General Mike Farnworth speaks during a press conference at the legislature in Victoria, Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. The British Columbia government is providing a few more details about travel restrictions aimed at limiting movement around the province to slow the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Periodic roadblocks but no individual stops planned for B.C.’s COVID-19 travel rules

Periodic roadblocks but no individual stops planned for B.C.’s COVID-19 travel rules

Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges empty vials of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine that she has provided to customers at the Junction Chemist, an independent pharmacy in Toronto, Monday, April 19, 2021. Younger Canadians in several provinces are now able to get the AstraZeneca vaccine. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Trudeau defends Canada’s travel restrictions as effective but open to doing more

Trudeau defends Canada’s travel restrictions as effective but open to doing more

People line up outside an immunization clinic to get their Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in Edmonton on Tuesday, April 20, 2021. Albertans are voting with their feet and arms as they line up and sign up in droves to get the vaccine now available to those 40 and older. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Albertans lining up, signing up as eligibility for AstraZeneca COVID vaccine expands

Albertans lining up, signing up as eligibility for AstraZeneca COVID vaccine expands

Government of Canada public pensions web page is shown on Tuesday, January 9, 2018. A national group representing about 300,000 pensioners says the new federal budget fails to mention reforms that are necessary to protect people with defined benefit retirement plans sponsored by employers. THE CANADIAN PRESS
Retiree group says Liberal budget fails to support pension reform

Retiree group says Liberal budget fails to support pension reform

FILE - This Aug. 13, 2020 photo shows a logo for Netflix on a remote control in Portland, Ore. Netflix’s rapid subscriber growth is slowing far faster than anticipated, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, as people who have been cooped at home during the pandemic are able to get out and do other things again. The video streaming service added 4 million more worldwide subscribers from January through March, its smallest gain during that three-month period in four years. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)
Netflix’s subscriber growth, stock zapped as pandemic eases

Netflix’s subscriber growth, stock zapped as pandemic eases

Most Read