No fuddle duddle: MP Trudeau hurls expletive at environment minister

OTTAWA — His father claimed to have only mouthed “fuddle duddle” during a heated Commons exchange, but a colourful outburst by Justin Trudeau during question period is leaving no room for confusion.

Justin Trudeau apologizes for swaering following Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday.

Justin Trudeau apologizes for swaering following Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Wednesday.

OTTAWA — His father claimed to have only mouthed “fuddle duddle” during a heated Commons exchange, but a colourful outburst by Justin Trudeau during question period is leaving no room for confusion.

The Liberal MP was heard quite clearly to have called Environment Minister Peter Kent a “piece of (expletive),” causing a momentary uproar in the House today.

Kent had just finished telling his NDP critic Megan Leslie that she was ill-informed about a recent climate-change conference because she hadn’t attended.

But the government had prevented opposition MPs from being part of the official Canadian delegation.

Following question period, Trudeau rose immediately to apologize.

“I lost my temper and used language that was most decidedly unparliamentary and for that I unreservedly apologize and withdraw my remarks,” he said.

Kent said he wasn’t troubled by the language, but asked that Trudeau apologize to the House of Commons.

New Democrat Ryan Cleary also got into trouble over language after he called a cabinet minister a “bully.”

Speaker Andrew Scheer suggested he withdraw the comment, but he refused.

“The minister of fisheries and oceans asked a question, he asked this House whether he looked like a bully,” Cleary said.

“I merely answered his question. I would answer his question the same way if he asked it again.”

Scheer said that wasn’t an acceptable retraction.

“The honourable member may have some difficulty getting recognized until he decides that he may want to respect the rules of the House,” the Speaker warned.

Cleary reconsidered: “I apologize and withdraw the remark.”

It has been a foul-mouthed season on Parliament Hill.

New Democrat MP Pat Martin recently used expletives on Twitter when the government limited debate on its budget bill, and interim Liberal leader Bob Rae referred to “(expletive)” in response to a negative tweet by another Liberal.