Ottawa finalizes contract to deliver Cyclones

OTTAWA — The Harper government formally signed a deal Wednesday to amend its contract with the U.S. manufacturer of the long-delayed CH-148 Cyclone maritime helicopters.

OTTAWA — The Harper government formally signed a deal Wednesday to amend its contract with the U.S. manufacturer of the long-delayed CH-148 Cyclone maritime helicopters.

The agreement with Sikorsky Aircraft — a division of United Technologies Corp. (NYSE: UTX) — paves the way for the retirement next year of Canada’s outdated fleet of Sea King choppers.

United Technologies issued a brief statement saying the contract amendment clears the way for the delivery of the 28 aircraft under the $5.7-billion program, which had been stalled and appeared in jeopardy of being cancelled last fall.

It did not disclose any details of about the new agreement.

It’s the second time the government has negotiated a contract amendment with Sikorsky, which has missed previous deadlines to deliver completed helicopters, accruing more than $88 million in penalties as a result.

It’s unclear how that will be resolved.

Public Works was as vague as the company on the specifics of the agreement.

“I am pleased that this contract has now been completed and that we can fulfill our government’s commitment to begin to retire the Sea Kings in 2015, and deliver a new and leading maritime helicopter to the Royal Canadian Air Force, while respecting taxpayer dollars,” Public Works Minister Diane Finley said in a statement.

The inability of the Conservatives to replace the anti-submarine helicopters, which are more than 50 years old and operate primarily off the decks of navy frigates, has been a huge political embarrassment.

One senior defence official said the Cyclones — a military version of Sikorsky’s S-92 helicopter — are expected to be delivered throughout 2015 and should begin flying limited operational missions from warships in early 2016.

As many as six pilots are already qualified to fly the aircraft, four of which have been parked at the military air base in Shearwater, N.S., near Halifax. Training is expected to ramp up once the new choppers are delivered.

Despite that, the Cyclones won’t be declared fully operational until 2018 when Sikorsky delivers a software package that integrates all elements of the aircraft’s mission and warfighting capabilities.

“We’re going to get a capable helicopter that we can grow in to,” the defence source said.

The government insists no additional money will be put into the program and Sikorsky would only get paid for the delivery of capable aircraft.

The air force is prepared to take ownership of up to eight test helicopters as part of the transition and to enhance training, said a government source.

There have been myriad technical concerns and delays in converting the S-92 into a more hardened military version.

The question of whether the Harper government would stick with the Cyclone came to the forefront last fall after then-public works minister Rona Ambrose ordered a review of whether the manufacturer could deliver on the contract signed with Paul Martin’s Liberals in 2004.

In addition to a report by consultants, officials also conducted an independent analysis of the financial implications of the existing program for the country’s defence industry, say documents released earlier this year under the Access to Information Act.

Rival aircraft makers were also asked what they might be able to provide if the government chose to cancel.

Internal documents showed last January that more than $1.7 billion has already been spent in preparing to receive the troubled choppers, making a political decision to stick with the program a foregone conclusion.

Public Works, which oversees the project, announced in January it would negotiate a revised agreement.

As part of the contract renegotiation, the air force was asked to revisit its list of expected capabilities, and asked to spell out clearly what aspects were essential as opposed to what they would like to see in the aircraft.

Defence officials insisted Wednesday there was absolutely no compromise on safety, especially on the issue of the engine gear box’s capacity to operate even with a severe loss of fluid.

Just Posted

Team Alberta athletes arrive in Red Deer Saturday for pre-Games orientation

Excitement is building with less than a month to go, says Team Alberta spokesperson

UPDATED: STARS Lottery is back

Lacombe STARS patient tells his story

Former Red Deer man named Mr. Gay Canada

To compete in Mr. Gay World

Sylvan Lake council adopts waterfront plan

Sustainable Waterfront Area Redevelopment Plan to guide development for next 20 years

Two people die in Rocky-area collision

Rocky Mountain House RCMP investigate

Trudeau says politicians shouldn’t prey on Canadians’ fears

The Prime Minister was speaking at a townhall in Ontario

In limbo: Leftover embryos challenge clinics, couples

Some are outright abandoned by people who quit paying storage fees and other couples struggle with tough decisions

Netflix rejects request to remove Lac-Megantic images from ‘Bird Box’

At least two shows on Netflix’s Canadian platform briefly use actual footage of the 2013 tragedy

Teen vaping is an epidemic: US government

E-cigarettes are now the top high-risk substance used by teenagers, outpacing cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana

‘I never said there was no collusion,’ Trump lawyer says

President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani says he has ‘never said there was no collusion’

Body of Canadian miner found after African kidnapping

Kirk Woodman’s body was discovered 100 kilometres from the site where he worked for Progress Mineral Mining Company in Burkina Faso

Canada’s Conners on his way to full PGA Tour card with fast start to 2019 season

Corey Conners was working on his putting last Friday when fellow Canadian… Continue reading

Canada’s Milos Raonic, Denis Shapovalov advance at Australian Open

MELBOURNE, Australia — Canada’s Milos Raonic and Denis Shapovalov have advanced to… Continue reading

Study finds more than half of food produced in Canada wasted

The study released Thursday is the world’s first to measure food waste using data from industry and other sources instead of estimates

Most Read