Power to kill dangerously used

I am responding to the article that attempted to exonerate a Calgary police officer of the death of a “suspect” being pursued by the said officer.

Re: Our view by Rick Zemanek, Aug. 16.

I am responding to the article that attempted to exonerate a Calgary police officer of the death of a “suspect” being pursued by the said officer.

According to Zemanek, the suspect, when cornered, turned towards the officer with a screwdriver in his hand, the area is dark and the officer could not identify what weapon, presuming there was one, was pointed at him or towards him. So the well-trained officer pumped four rounds into the body of the person in front of him, not knowing if this guy was the suspect or some guy who went for a pee, was startled by being interrupted and came out of the shadows to confront the intruder.

So he shot the guy four times — four times.

We, as citizens, never learn where the bullets entered the body, the size of the entry wound, the size of the exit wound, the velocity of the bullet, the size of the weapon and where the bullets entered the body. Since we are never told, then I am able to make an assumption that the shots were a tight pattern around the heart and lungs and the man was dead before the fourth bullet entered his body.

I suggest there were no bullet wounds in the legs, knees, shoulder or arms of the suspect!

The police officer is trained in killing. Tell me of another group besides the military in Canada who receive such training. Police have the right that no other citizen of Canada has — to defend themselves with the use of deadly force. Not force in relation to the crime or the possible injury to him/herself, but the right to kill; to shoot for the greatest body mass. Murder? No, self defence.

Just don’t you try to protect yourself or your property in the same manner because you are now a vigilante and taking “justice” into your own hands.

Remember, the police and military are the only ones trained to handle the situation with the use of deadly force.

As for police Chief Hanson, what a statement! “I don’t think anyone in the city would say the police officer should have turned on his tail and ran like a scared rabbit.” How inane! The officer is the person with the offensive weapon— why should he run? He had the communicative ability to call for back up! Why should he run?

He had the power in this situation. Sorry, chief. That statement provides no defence for your employee, only an asinine attempt at logic. And in case a officer comes calling on me, that is a pen in my hand!

Leo Belanger

Ponoka