Redistribution of wealth at heart of Notley’s plan

A constant statement from the defenders of Rachel Notley for her government’s delay in bringing forth a budget is that Peter Lougheed was also in no rush when he came to power.

Re: Judgment on Rachel Notley letter to the editor by Rod Trentham, Aug. 21 Advocate:

A constant statement from the defenders of Rachel Notley for her government’s delay in bringing forth a budget is that Peter Lougheed was also in no rush when he came to power.

There is a vast difference between then and now.

The first is that Lougheed inherited a debt-free province that existed under 35 years of Social Credit. A feat that no other government in Canada could claim.

This, in spite of the fact that Alberta was considered a “have-not” province in 1961.

Also, this was achieved before the oil price spike that occurred after the reign of Social Credit.

The second difference is that a significant portion of Alberta’s revenues come from oil royalties and from the companies and workers that work in that industry.

Thousands have been laid off, including hundreds from Central Alberta.

From a TD Securities report last week, more than three-quarters of Canada’s daily output of crude from oilsands is being produced at a loss at current prices.

If you haven’t noticed, commodities in general have crashed even worse that during the previous crisis, such as agricultural prices with the exception of beef. You don’t do a royalty review when the target of that review is under severe duress.

As for regulations, ask small business owners about the massive hike that Notley’s NDP government is imposing on them in the way of minimum wage hikes. That alone shows that Notley is all about redistribution, but she’s not showing her full hand until after the federal election. That might upset her comrades.

Ted Johnson

Red Deer