Suzuki’s position lacks merit

There really is no pleasing the David Suzuki Foundation. Over the years, Canada’s pesticide regulatory system has become more protective of human health and the environment, more transparent and more inclusive of non-governmental organizations.

There really is no pleasing the David Suzuki Foundation.

Over the years, Canada’s pesticide regulatory system has become more protective of human health and the environment, more transparent and more inclusive of non-governmental organizations.

Meanwhile, the plant science industry continues to invest in research to develop tools that help farmers protect the crops they grow from insect, diseases and weeds and grow safe, affordable food. As a result, today’s crop protection products are applied at ever-decreasing rates, are more targeted than ever before and have never been safer for people or the environment.

The plant science industry understands that agriculture’s long-term sustainability depends on maintaining biodiversity within natural ecosystems and agricultural landscapes. And thanks in part to our technologies, Canadian agriculture has never been more sustainable than it is today.

It is mind-boggling to read that a foundation that claims to advocate for a sustainable future is suggesting that we go back to agricultural practices from decades ago when soil erosion was an epidemic, yields were only a fraction of what they are today and bee populations were actually much less robust than they are today. The truth of the matter is that activist groups like this aren’t looking for solutions, they’re looking for public profile — as evidenced by the “Donate” button that is always prominent.

While we work with all stakeholders, including the Canadian Honey Council, to identify solution-focused approaches to ensure a sustainable future for agriculture and beekeeping, activist groups such as these are entrenched in unworkable positions and don’t seem to care if they jeopardize the progress that’s being collaboratively made.

Pierre Petelle

Vice-president of chemistry

CropLife Canada

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