Tories quietly revise policy governing use of information gained through torture

OTTAWA — The federal government has directed Canada’s spy agency to use information that may have been extracted through torture in cases where public safety is at stake.

OTTAWA — The federal government has directed Canada’s spy agency to use information that may have been extracted through torture in cases where public safety is at stake.

The order represents a reversal of policy for the Conservative government, which once insisted the Canadian Security Intelligence Service would discard information if there was any inkling it might be tainted.

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews has quietly told CSIS the government now expects the spy service to “make the protection of life and property its overriding priority.”

A copy of the two-page December 2010 directive was obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act.

It drew swift condemnation from Amnesty International Canada, which said information obtained under torture “has no place in the justice system, full stop.”

The NDP and Liberals also pounced on the revelations Tuesday in the House of Commons, pressing the government to account for its new stance.

The directive from Toews expands upon a May 2009 ministerial order that states CSIS must not knowingly rely upon information derived from torture, and have measures in place to identify such tainted information.

The latest directive says in “exceptional circumstances” where there is a threat to human life or public safety, urgency may require CSIS to “share the most complete information available at the time with relevant authorities, including information based on intelligence provided by foreign agencies that may have been derived from the use of torture or mistreatment.”

In such rare cases, it may not always be possible to determine how a foreign agency obtained the information, and that ignoring such information solely because of its source would represent “an unacceptable risk to public safety.”

“Therefore, in situations where a serious risk to public safety exists, and where lives may be at stake, I expect and thus direct CSIS to make the protection of life and property its overriding priority, and share the necessary information — properly described and qualified — with appropriate authorities.”

The directive says the final decision to investigate and analyze information that may have been obtained by methods condemned by the Canadian government falls to the CSIS director or his deputy director for operations — a decision to be made “in accordance with Canada’s legal obligations.”

Finally, it says the minister is to be notified “as appropriate” of a decision to use such information.

In spring 2009, a senior CSIS official ignited controversy when he told a House of Commons committee the spy service would overlook the origin of information if it could prevent another Air India jetliner bombing or a terrorist attack along the lines of the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackings in the United States.

The government quickly moved to extinguish the public flareup.

Peter Van Loan, then public safety minister, said CSIS had been clear about rejecting information extracted through coercion.

“As a practical matter, they get intelligence from all kinds of sources, a myriad of sources. An important part of their process is to try and identify how credible that is,” Van Loan said at the time.

“If there’s any indication, any evidence that torture may have been used, that information is discounted.”

In an emailed statement, the Public Safety Department said the 2010 directive “provides greater clarity to CSIS” and that “all CSIS activities, including sharing information with foreign agencies, comply with Canada’s laws and legal obligations.”

Added Mike Patton, a spokesman for Toews: “Our government will always take action that protects the lives of Canadians.”

Canadian law enforcement and security agencies should focus on getting rid of information that bears the taint of torture, not on carving out exceptions for when it can be used, said Alex Neve, secretary general of Amnesty International Canada.

“The bottom line is that as long as torturers continue to find a market for the fruit of their crimes, torture will continue,” he said. “Firmly rebuffing torturers when they offer up information extracted through pain and suffering is a critical plank in the wider campaign to eradicate torture once and for all.”

NDP justice critic Jack Harris accused the government of “getting Canada into the torture business.”

“Can the minister please tell us what has changed?’ he said during the daily question period. ”Why the sudden tacit endorsement of the use of torture as a matter of policy?“

Toews said information obtained by torture “is always discounted.”

“But the problem is, can one safely ignore it if Canadian lives and property are at stake?”

Earlier, interim Liberal Leader Bob Rae said he’s concerned about such a ministerial directive being issued “without real discussion with Canadians about its implications.”

“The law in Canada has been pretty clear that information based on torture, first of all, is not reliable and, second of all, is not permissible.”

In the Commons, he asked the minister to explain how the directive lines up with international law and a Supreme Court of Canada ruling on the subject.

CSIS spokeswoman Tahera Mufti had no comment.

— With a file from Bruce Cheadle

Just Posted

Hospitalizations jump in Red Deer due to opioid poisonings

Small city hospitals impacted more by opioid crisis

Central Alberta councils learn more about Bighorn Country proposal

A collection of central Alberta politicians are learning more about the province’s… Continue reading

High-speed chase led to fatal collision, jury hears

A Delburne man accused of manslaughter caused a fatal rollover collision during… Continue reading

‘Part of the solution:’ Alberta seeks proposals to build new refinery

EDMONTON — Alberta is looking for someone to build a new oil… Continue reading

Online ads spoil Christmas surprises, raising privacy concerns: experts

Lisa Clyburn knew she had found the perfect gift for her nine-year-old… Continue reading

Sebastian Giovinco, Jonathan Osorio and Adriana Leon up for top CONCACAF awards

Toronto FC’s Sebastian Giovinco and Jonathan Osorio are up for CONCACAF male… Continue reading

Huitema, Cornelius named 2018 Canadian Youth International Players of the Year

TORONTO — Canada Soccer has named striker Jordyn Huitema and defender Derek… Continue reading

Review: Too much Spider-Man? Not in the Spider-Verse

You might be forgiven for feeling superhero overload this holiday season. Had… Continue reading

‘Modern Family’s’ Sarah Hyland had second kidney transplant

LOS ANGELES — “Modern Family” star Sarah Hyland says she had a… Continue reading

Orlando SC acquires Canadian Tesho Akindele in trade with FC Dallas for cash

ORLANDO, Fla. — Canadian forward Tesho Akindele was traded to Orlando City… Continue reading

Koskinen notches third shutout, McDavid gets winner as Oilers blank Flames 1-0

EDMONTON — The Edmonton Oilers appear to have shored up their defence… Continue reading

Most Read