Vehicle idling habits in city show a sense of entitlement

I now consider myself a proud Red Deerian, residing for the last four years in this amazing city.

  • Nov. 18, 2014 9:09 p.m.

I now consider myself a proud Red Deerian, residing for the last four years in this amazing city.

Having come from Vancouver Island, I must say that our transition to Red Deer was surprisingly gentle. The wonderful green spaces this city offers makes up nicely for the greenery left behind on the Island.

There is, however, one black eye that reveals itself every fall and winter in this otherwise fine city: vehicles left idling for extended periods of time.

I have witnessed this in all areas of the city from street-metered parking in the downtown core, Bower and Parkland malls and even at the Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre.

In all fairness, the vehicles I’ve witnessed idling, doors locked, the vehicle empty of passengers, range from compact cars to SUVs and large half- and three-quarter ton trucks. However, the majority of these global warmers are the huge trucks.

One would think that based on the successful economy here in Alberta, oil and natural gas, of which I assume the majority of the owners of these vehicles draw their living from, would hold a sense of responsibility to the environment.

Unfortunately, I see more of a sense of entitlement.

It’s sad that with all the economic success this province has to offer that those reaping the financial benefits choose to be so irresponsible.

I applaud the town of Canmore for recently adopting a new anti-idling bylaw, limiting the idling of a vehicle to five minutes, less they receive a $90 fine.

I challenge the city councillors of Red Deer to do the same!

Show your support for the environment by limiting the public carbon footprint in our city. Our children will breathe easier for it.

Grant Damsgaard

Red Deer