What’s in a name? Plenty when they are all the same

We moved into Oriole Park in Red Deer in 2010 and started using the city pathways hoping to get a feel for the city. We usually carried a small garbage bag and picked up garbage as we walked.

We moved into Oriole Park in Red Deer in 2010 and started using the city pathways hoping to get a feel for the city. We usually carried a small garbage bag and picked up garbage as we walked.

In our walks, we discovered the Oriole Park Fitness Park, in Oriole Park of all places!

In the past three months that we have run the pathways, the fitness park became garbage central with fast-food bags, napkins, containers and cups scattered around the area.

Imagine my anger on a recent Sunday morning on finding sod, dirt, rocks and cement chunks dumped in the grass area beside the fitness park and parking area.

After picking rocks, etc., I thought I should notify the city staff to rake and clean the area before mowing it, so I checked the sign to better pinpoint the area. What a surprise! I was no longer in the Oriole Fitness Park, but at Waskasoo Park, according to the sign.

No — it is not Waskasoo Park south of the river — but north of Heritage Ranch. No — it is not Waskasoo Park where Piper Creek flows through either and it is not in the Waskasoo area of the city. It is not Waskasoo Park on the east side of the river by the Red Deer Cemetery or by Kerry Wood Nature Centre. It is not Waskasoo Park on the west side of the river by Riverside Drive, nor east of the Pines, nor the northeast park in Northlands!

This is like the Oxbow Dog Park that is nowhere near the Oxbow area of Oriole Park!

Little wonder visitor could not find downtown, thus the need for a sign.

The mental exercise of finding a garbage can and naming city areas must come from the same jug.

Thank goodness for postal codes!

Ed Powell

Red Deer